Rise Art

Affordable Art Fair 2010

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on October 27, 2010

As most of you perhaps know by now, Rise Art supported artist Katie Rand during her residency at the Affordable Art Fair. The event was a capital success for Katie: her work gained huge exposure, given that over 20,000 people came to the fair – most of which loved her work! Her business- and post- cards were gone like hot cakes. Finally, Katie won the hearts of future collectors by hosting a fun-tastic workshop for kids, in which they really engaged. Did you have the chance to see Katie’s work? What did you think?

Below a few pictures to round-up the atmosphere at AAF. To see more of our pictures, visit our Flickr profile.Katie’s mouthwatering stand.

The amount of visitors and the abundance of works being purchased.

Katie’s workshop with the kids.

Did you go to the Affordable Art Fair? What did you like best? Which artist or gallery? Share it with our community!

Interview with Katie Rand – Winner of the First Rise Art Emerging Artists Grant

Posted in Interview by Scott @ Rise Art on October 20, 2010

Artist Katie Rand is about to take part in the Affordable Art Fair in Battersea Park from 21-24 October 2010 as an Artist-in-Residence. As the first artist to be selected and supported by Rise Art‘s Emerging Artists Grant programme– we have had the opportunity to ask her about her work and plans, and to introduce her mouth-watering, ephemeral work to our community.

Rise Art: Katie, in advance of your residency at Affordable Art Fair, what should people know about you and your background as an artist?

Katie Rand: I graduated this summer from the Arts University College Bournemouth, with a first class honours. During my time there I was involved in many exhibitions and events. My first London based exhibition was this year, at Free Range. I feel excited and honoured to have been invited to be the Artist-in- Residence this October at the AAF, and to have received Rise Art’s Production Grant to make this possible.

RA: Your choice of working with foods sets you apart form most artists. Why did you choose food as your preferred medium?

K.R.: I ask myself this question everyday! It all started at the end of my first year at University. I became interested in the child psychology, and the psychology of smell. Senses play a fundamental role in our everyday lives, which are often taken for granted. I began to question the way in which we view art. The visual is the obvious choice, and often sound, however smell is quite frequently ignored. How would a viewer react to purely smell and no visual? Would this still be considered art? Though experimentation and process I began to question the olfactory memory. Food became a key material, as it had many associations with childhood. It is a material that challenges my making, the perception of art and ones psychology.

RA: Food, unlike many materials artists use, is not durable but ephemeral – how does that impact on your work?

K.R.: The ephemeral qualities of my work play an important role. My work is often painstakingly tedious. It takes a great deal of time, planning and consideration. It excites me that there is never a permanent trace, apart from a memory or documentation of the work. I don’t like permanence as nothing lasts forever. I always have a starting point and a finishing point during the making process. The removal and destruction of the work is the finishing point. If I don’t reach this position the work is not complete.

RA: Are there any individuals or experiences that have impacted on your work?

K.R.: My work is influenced by so many things; however I am interested and inspired by Minimalism. The formal qualities interest me as does the machismo of the time. I often challenge these through my choice of material and structures, creating a sense of irony.

RA: The work you are doing for your residency at the Affordable Art Fair is a site-specific installation. How did you find the suitable installation for this location? What was your process in deciding what to do?

K.R.: The theme this October at the AAF is ‘Food Glorious Food’. That is why they approached me to be the artist-in-residence as my practice is fitting! I choose to re create (Memory 2008) because I wanted both children and adults to enjoy the work. It is fun, vibrant and interactive, which suits the AAF concept. I worked closely with the Program Manager throughout the decision, as I wanted it to be right for everyone.

RA: You graduated with a BA in Fine Art in 2010; how has the transition from school to being an artist been for you so far?

K.R.: So far so good! My feet are yet to touch the ground! I feel very lucky to have been given such a great opportunity with The Affordable Art Fair, so soon after graduating. Companies such as Rise Art and South West Artwork have been a great support.

RA: Where do you see the direction of your work heading? Do you have any particular plans?

K.R.: I have been offered a place on an MA Fine Art Course in London. I will be looking forward to starting next year. I have a couple of exhibitions lined up for 2011, which I am looking forward to also.

RA: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

K.R.: I have no idea! I know I would like to still be practicing! My life would be incomplete without art.

Katie’s work is viewable at the Affordable Art Fair from 21-24 October. Rise Art is proud to be supporting Katie’s work as Artist-in-Residence, with our new grant scheme enabling emerging artists to finish their projects . We will announce the next opportunity to submit work and be considered for the Rise Art Emerging Artists Grant in the forthcoming weeks – email info@riseart.com to receive further information on the programme.

Collecting: A Beginner’s Guide

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on October 11, 2010

As you are reading this entry, we can assume you are interested in art and enjoy engaging with it. However, the idea of buying art for the first time can seem overwhelming, given the myriad of possibilities; the sheer number of mediums, styles and periods make it difficult to know where to start.

There are no rules prevailing on how to start a collection, other than picking to your taste, which will often naturally form a coherent collection with a conceptual framework over time. As you begin to discover your own interests and begin to build confidence in your taste, this will become much easier.

Why collect Art? Illustration by hjx

Here are a few tips of advice on how you can start getting involved, acquiring your first piece or start a collection:

  1. Buy a work because you enjoy and love it, not because you expect to profit from it.
  2. Shop around for art: Visit as many galleries and museums as you can in order to see what is on offer and discover what you like. Don’t be afraid to ask questions or ask for advice.
  3. Subscribe to gallery newsletters in order to be invited to openings and special events.
  4. Explore outlets: There are not only galleries, but also art fairs, auction houses, degree shows, artists’ studios and online galleries. Art Maps and calendars are generally available at most galleries, listing new shows and previews.
  5. Engage with art. Focus on what an artist is trying to communicate rather than traditional standards of aesthetic.
  6. Read art magazines; we have listed a number we appreciate here.
  7. Do your research: the greater your knowledge, the greater your understanding; the Internet has made it easy to research artists and galleries online.
  8. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Most people working in the arts do so out of passion, so they enjoy talking about art.
  9. Pick the best within your means. Many contemporary artists also create works in limited editions, which are more affordable. Alternatively, seek out younger or lesser-known artists. If price is an issue, seek out regional programs that can help minimize the burden. In England the own art scheme provides collectors with interest free loans for purchases of less than £2000.
  10. Once you have bought a work, look after it. The biggest threats are direct light and humidity. You might event want to consider insurance for Art purchases.

A number of books have been written on how to start a collection, such as Owning Art: The Contemporary Art Collector’s Handbook by Louisa Buck and Judith Greer, The Art of Buying Art: An Insider’s Guide to Collecting Contemporary Art by Paige West or Collecting Contemporary by Adam Lindemann. They cover the basics to get you started, but we believe the best way to learn is by doing it!

What was the first work of art you acquired? How did you do it? Share your experiences with the Rise Art community!

How to survive an Art Fair

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on October 4, 2010

Art Fairs represent an excellent way of seeing what is ‘out there’ in one place. Galleries are gathered to show curated projects or works by their entire stable of artists, allowing visitors to see a wide range of work. Most fairs have a special theme surrounding them, thereby catering for a variety of tastes and interests.

Multiplied, for example, which specialised in showing contemporary prints and multiples. Pinta Art Fair is focusing  on contemporary Latin American Art.  Frieze Art Fair is the most famous London-based contemporary art fair. The Affordable Art Fair is a great way of discovering affordable works of art. Being interested in contemporary art, you will eventually end up attending at least one of these. Given the ever increasing popularity of these events, they can quickly turn into a real frenzy. Having spent a lot of time at fairs, we believe we might have a few useful tips for how to make the best of  a day at an art fair:

  1. Wear comfortable clothes, and ladies, think flats!
  2. Be prepared. Check upfront who is exhibiting and note the stands you really want to see.
  3. Get a map at the entrance to see where you want to head. It is also handy if you have a bad sense of orientation!
  4. Don’t be shy to ask questions to the gallery representative at the stand – that is what they are here for.
  5. Leave your contact details with galleries where you saw works of artists that triggered  your interest, so you will receive invitations to future exhibitions as well as news on the particular artist.
  6. Bring a notepad and pen to capture the names of galleries and/or artists that appealed most to you.
  7. If you are not one of the lucky ones being invited to the preview day, try to avoid rush-hour. Ensure you go at a time and day other people might not be able to.
  8. Do take your time – most art fairs are of considerable size and you want to get most out of it – it is impossible to race through Frieze Art Fair in one or two hours if you want to see work.
  9. Always have some spare change with you, so you can buy yourself some coffee or water at the coffee shop without having to queue for the cash-machine.
  10. Do all of the above and you are in for a wonderful day of discoveries!