Rise Art

Our Pick: Rise Art’s top 5 Gallery Exhibitions of 2010

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on December 15, 2010

The Rise Art Team enjoyed compiling a top 5 museum exhibition list so much (see here) that we have opted to extend our shortlist bring your our top 5 gallery exhibition highlights of 2010. This time, however, given the breadth of gallery shows globally, and our limited time and travel budgets, we have kept the shortlist focused on London based galleries. In no particular order, here are our picks:

Vincent Fecteau at Greengrassi

San-Francisco based Vincent Fecteau might turn into one of the most influential contemporary artists working with formal languages of sculpture. His reference-abounding work was put onto the gallery walls like trophies. Fantastic!

Superunknown at Edel Assanti

This group show curated by Rise Art artist Andy Wicks and David Northedge consisted of twelve artists. Their work addressed a future full of dreams, illusions and fantasies, celebrating the neglected virtues of the glossy, lurid and bizarre. It was a great pleasure seeing so much young talent! Artists included: Michael Ashcroft, MAtthew Atkinson, Gordon Cheung, Sayshun Jay, Graham McNamara, David Northedge, Ed Payne, James Roper, Rob Sherwood, David Small, Andy Wicks and Rosalie Wiesner. We could be a bit biased on this one, but we really enjoyed it.

Noemie Goudal at Hotshoe Gallery

Parisian-born Noemie Goudal is an outstanding newcomer in photography; her show at Hotshoe Gallery displayed her series ‘Les Amants’ – her best so far! Since then she has been shown as part of the Anticipation event at Selfridges and her work is starting to get noticed by collectors outside of the M25. She is on our list of artist to expect big things of in 2011.

Louise Bourgeois at Hauser & Wirth

Haunch of Venison showed works by the late Louise Bourgeois, who passed away earlier this year – aged 98. The show focused on her works with fabric and we thought it was great. The show is on until December 18th – go see it if you have time!

Elaine Sturevant at Anthony Reynolds Gallery

This american artist became renown for playing with the concept of originality and her copies of other artists’ works; this time, it is a film in three acts: ‘Elastic Tango’ – a cosmic dance, perhaps?

I am sure we missed many more great exhibitions in London. What were your favorites?

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Our Pick: The top 5 Museum Exhibitions in 2010

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on December 8, 2010

As the end of the year nears, the Rise Art Team has picked our top 5 exhibition across the global museum landscape in 2010. Some of them run into 2011 and we highly recommend to go see them, if you are around. Here they are:

100 Years (version 2) at Moma PS1, New York City

November 1, 2009 – May 3, 2010

In collaboration with Performa, P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center created 100 Years (version #2, ps1, nov 2009), an exhibition presenting influential moments in the past century of performance art history.With over 200 works including film, photography, documents, and audio, the exhibition presented a wealth of information that is largely unknown and is intended as an archive for students, scholars, and enthusiasts of the history of performance art. It provided an excellent overview and insight.

Anish Kapoor: Turning the World Upside down at Kensington Gardens, London

September 28, 2010 – March 13, 2011

This exhibition organised by Serpentine Gallery and The Royal Parks showcases major recent works by London-based artist Anish Kapoor, The sculptures are sited to contrast and reflect the changing colours, foliage and weather in Kensington Gardens – creating stunning effects. The distortions in the works’ mirror-like surfaces call into question the viewers’ relationship to both the work itself and the surrounding environment. We found it a beautiful and unexpected way to enjoy the park.

1989. End of History or Beginning of the Future? at Kunsthalle, Vienna

October 9, 2009 – February 7, 2010

In 1989, the opening of the Iron Curtain marked the end of the Cold War and created an entirely novel geopolitical and mass-psychological situation. 20 years later, this exhibition investigated the metaphors connected with the collapse of the bipolar division of the world into East and West and the political upheaval, metaphors that are more than ever of relevance for a wide variety of different spheres of life.


André Kertész at Jeu de Paume, Paris

September 28, 2010 – February 6, 2011

During our stay in Paris to visit Paris Photo, we visited the exhibition of the photographer André Kertész. This comprehensive retrospective is the most extensive so far on show in Europe and definitely worth a visit, as his work is outstanding and plays an important part in the development of photography as an art form.


Neo Rauch – Companion at both,Museum of Fine Arts, Leibzig and Pinakothek, Munich

April 18 – August 15, 2010


For the painter’s 50th birthday, both museums organised his first major retrospective. Rauch, from the Leipzig Academy of Visual Arts is one of Germany’s most popular contemporary artists. Both shows, which offered a comprehensive look at his works since 1993 featured many works from private collection and unknown to the public until then.

Rise Art Artist Chris Hughes featured at Bloomberg New Contemporaries at the ICA

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on December 3, 2010

The Institute of Contemporary Art in London features annually the Bloomberg New Contemporaries, a highly regarded exhibition showcasing a snapshot of today’s emerging art landscape. Originally established in 1949 – it’s 2010 edition features 49 artists from across the UK working across all media. It offers recent graduates and art students essential support and recognition at a crucial stage in their development.

One of the artists selected for the 2010 exhibition is Chris Hughes, who also features on the Rise Art website. We are very exited for Chris to have such extraordinary opportunity and would like to congratulate him! Chris’ work deals with ‘places of trauma’; his drawings, which are currently displayed at the ICA and on the Rise Art homepage, are of extraordinary detail. Rise Art was at the opening of the show, and captured his work displayed at the ICA.

The panel for the 2010 exhibition consisted of former Turner Prize Winner Mark Leckey, Mexican artist Gabriel Kuri and the rising-star artist Dawn Mellor.

Rise Art @ Gallery Primo Alonso – ‘God is in the Details’

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on December 1, 2010

Over the past months Rise Art has been teaming up with galleries and events, supporting artists and curators alike. Currently Rise Art is working in collaboration with  Gallery Primo Alonso to host “God is in the Details” an exhibit which celebrates 13 artists across a variety of media who demonstrate a thorough and meticulous approach to their practice. Co-curators Medeia Cohen-Petrolino and Justin Hammond carefully selected the artists, aiming create a show ‘not just about the beauty that hard work produces, but also about a certain recognition for the technique and the skill involved.’

Among the artists represented are past Catlin Art Prize winner Alex Ball, and Rise Art artist Martin Krolzig. Krolzig was discovered by curator Medeia Cohen-Petrolino while reviewing artist portfolio’s on Rise Art. Said Cohen- Petrolino “Rise Art has been a great place for us to discover artists we wouldn’t normally have exposure to. We are excited to have Martin’s work as part of the exibit”

In celebration of the event, on Thursday, December 2nd at 7pm, Rise Art is hosting a evening reception at London’s Gallery Primo Alonso during which co-curator Justin Hammond and artists will introduce the show and works. The event is open to all by following the below RSVP link.

Event Details and RSVP here

How to package Artwork (for Shipping)

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on November 17, 2010

Packaging Artwork for Shipping

Before getting started you might want to ensure the surfaces you are planning to wrap your work on are clean.  Additionally, you might want to consider laying out a heaving plastic cloth on which to wrap the work.

Depending on what type of medium the work consists of, it will have different packaging requirements; below, we have outlined instructions for works on paper and canvas:

Work on Paper

What you need for works on paper:

  • Acid free tissue paper
  • Flat pack, print pad or cardboard
  • Packing tape
  • Cutter or Scissors

At Rise Art we recommend that you never lift an un-mounted drawing or print by itself. Rather, slide a sheet of cardboard beneath the work as support and hold the cardboard, not the work. If you must use your hands, please use tissue paper or photography gloves so that your fingers do not touch the artwork since oils from our fingers damage paper. Remember to support the long sides of the cardboard with both hands.

  1. Protect the work with acid free tissue paper on both, the front and the back of the artwork.
  2. To prevent bending, place two or three layers of cardboard on both sides of the work. Ensure the cardboard pieces stay together by taping around the outside.
  3. A little trick to ensure the artwork does not move within the cardboard is to fold sheets of paper into triangles with one open end each.
  4. Place the taped up cardboard between two pieces of corrugated cardboard and tape all sides securely.
  5. Mark clearly ‘fragile’ and your name on the outside.
  6. NOTE: Serigraph prints are best shipped flat since they are prone to crack. Also, if the work of art is a valuable investment, it is not recommended to roll fine art since corners can get bent and the art could be accidentally creased.

Work on canvas

  • Acid free tissue paper
  • Bubble wrap
  • Tape
  • Cardboard corners – fold cardboard into triangles, leaving one side open
  • Corrugated cardboard
  • Foam board
  • A cardboard box – a little bigger than the work you wish to wrap.
  1. Place acid free paper on the painting surface, or wrap the whole work with it – this will protect the work from moisture and dust.
  2. Then, wrap the painting in generously in bubble wrap, without leaving anything uncovered.
  3. Secure with tape.
  4. Add the cardboard corners to secure the corners of the work – which again, you have to secure with tape.
  5. Place corrugated cardboard or foam board around the canvas.
  6. Add an additional layer of bubble wrap around the corrugated cardboard.
  7. Place the wrapped painting inside a cardboard box lined with foam board. The box should be the same proportions as the painting and fit snugly to prevent the painting from bouncing around inside. Should the box be too big, fill it with bubblewrap or foamboard.
  8. Mark the outside of the box clearly with the term ‘fragile’ and your name.

Last, but not least, as artist, curator and blogger Kirsty Hall suggests, add clear instructions of how to best wrap and unwrap your work for the recipient. The Artist, Emerging blog reminds us that it is helpful to use re-useable packaging material, particularly if you except the work to be sent back to you.

A Guide to Planning your Degree Show

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on November 4, 2010

The degree show representing a crucial moment in an artist’s career, we believe one should plan ahead in order to get the most out of it. Thus at Rise Art, we are writing about it in the middle of November!

Below are a few points worth considering; some might seem obvious, but many times we have missed some or all of these points when visiting shows.

1. Planning, planning, planning

Ensure you receive the precise dates for your final show from your course coordinator or leader as soon as possible. This will provide you with a set time frame in which things need to be done; and it is not only your work that needs to be finished and displayed, but plenty other things should be done, too.

2. Marketing

Many people in the art world enjoy going to degree shows to spot the next talents. In order to ensure they find out about your show, we suggest you undertake some marketing.

Once you know the dates and venue, ask your university or college to advertise the degree show on their website or create your own website with your fellow students. It can be a simple website, or blog, such as wordpress, or sites.google.com. We believe that the following information is relevant:

  • Most importantly, visiting info (including date,venue, opening times, map)
  • Names of all students showing, ideally with a picture of the work and contact details (you might want to extend this and add statements, etc)
  • Provide the details of the courses that are represented at the degree show, such as ‘Fine Art’, ‘Illustration’, ‘Photography’, etc
  • Gather ideas from how others students/universities did this before yourself

3. Promote the Show

To help promote the event, to get the word out there use social media, such as twitter, tumblr or facebook. If these networks are entirely new to you, Mashable explains in an intelligible way how to tackle all of these.

Another or additional way to promote yourself is to prints posters and flyer and to canvas them around town, from pubs and bars to galleries and museums.

4. The degree show itself

Wherever possible, see if you can see the venue in which your work will be displayed as soon as possible to get an idea and feel of the space and how you wish to display your works.

Depending on the venue you might want to consider putting up signage for visitors to help them orientate themselves.

Ensure you have labels and artist statements next to your work. Addionally, have busiensscards available for interested individuals to take away. This is important so people who enjoyed your work can get in touch with you! Ideally, the entire course has the identical lay-out on all the material provided. Further, you might want to consider leaving a book for comments, feedback and contacts on the premiseses.

Try to stay in touch with people who left their contact details for you – by sending them newsletters informing them about upcoming projects and shows.

From your experience, are there other points that need to be raised? Share them with us!

Collecting: A Beginner’s Guide

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on October 11, 2010

As you are reading this entry, we can assume you are interested in art and enjoy engaging with it. However, the idea of buying art for the first time can seem overwhelming, given the myriad of possibilities; the sheer number of mediums, styles and periods make it difficult to know where to start.

There are no rules prevailing on how to start a collection, other than picking to your taste, which will often naturally form a coherent collection with a conceptual framework over time. As you begin to discover your own interests and begin to build confidence in your taste, this will become much easier.

Why collect Art? Illustration by hjx

Here are a few tips of advice on how you can start getting involved, acquiring your first piece or start a collection:

  1. Buy a work because you enjoy and love it, not because you expect to profit from it.
  2. Shop around for art: Visit as many galleries and museums as you can in order to see what is on offer and discover what you like. Don’t be afraid to ask questions or ask for advice.
  3. Subscribe to gallery newsletters in order to be invited to openings and special events.
  4. Explore outlets: There are not only galleries, but also art fairs, auction houses, degree shows, artists’ studios and online galleries. Art Maps and calendars are generally available at most galleries, listing new shows and previews.
  5. Engage with art. Focus on what an artist is trying to communicate rather than traditional standards of aesthetic.
  6. Read art magazines; we have listed a number we appreciate here.
  7. Do your research: the greater your knowledge, the greater your understanding; the Internet has made it easy to research artists and galleries online.
  8. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Most people working in the arts do so out of passion, so they enjoy talking about art.
  9. Pick the best within your means. Many contemporary artists also create works in limited editions, which are more affordable. Alternatively, seek out younger or lesser-known artists. If price is an issue, seek out regional programs that can help minimize the burden. In England the own art scheme provides collectors with interest free loans for purchases of less than £2000.
  10. Once you have bought a work, look after it. The biggest threats are direct light and humidity. You might event want to consider insurance for Art purchases.

A number of books have been written on how to start a collection, such as Owning Art: The Contemporary Art Collector’s Handbook by Louisa Buck and Judith Greer, The Art of Buying Art: An Insider’s Guide to Collecting Contemporary Art by Paige West or Collecting Contemporary by Adam Lindemann. They cover the basics to get you started, but we believe the best way to learn is by doing it!

What was the first work of art you acquired? How did you do it? Share your experiences with the Rise Art community!

Our team’s 10 favourite books on Art, it’s History and Market

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on September 21, 2010

With the great amount of books and publications on art available, it might at first seem hard to navigate around and find a good entry point into the subject. Thus, the Rise Art Team has decided to share our top 10 books on art, art history and the art market with you. We would love for everyone to add their favourite book to the post, in order to generate an extensive collection of titles.

Our top 10, in no particular order:

  1. The Story of Art – E. H. Gombrich. This highly regarded work provides a comprehensive overview of the history of Western art; it is a great classic by one of the most significant art historians Sir Ernst Gombrich.
  2. Seven Days in the Art World – Sarah Thornton. The author illustrates the contemporary art world with seven important events at the high end of the realm. Informative and entertaining.
  3. The Intrepid Art Collector – Lisa Hunter. This informative guide represents a great starter reference for the novice, giving confidence on starting a very on little collection.
  4. From Manet to Manhattan – Peter Watson. An excellent book providing a good overview of the development of the current art market. However, having been written in 1992, at the time the art market started to boom, it would be great to get an update on today’s status.
  5. The $12 Million Stuffed Shark – Don Thompson. If there is an update on the contemporary art market, it is this one.
  6. Davenport’s Art Reference and Price Guide – Book and CD-ROM. This is the standard artist directory containing information on over 320,000 international artists, including their biography and pricing information.
  7. The Art of the Steal – Christopher Mason. An account of the big price-fixing scandal by two major auction houses: Christie’s and Sotheby’s. If involved in the art world, you should know about it; further, it really helps understanding the auction business.
  8. The Power of Art – Simon Schama Originally a TV series of the BBC, it was later turned into a book and is an incredibly accessible read; the author’s passion for the subject comes through, making it a very enjoyable read.
  9. The Art Crowd – Sophy Burnham. Illustrates the art scene very well; it might have been written a while ago, but is still accurate.
  10. Styles, schools and Movements – Amy Dempsey. An encyclopaedic guide to modern art. With all the styles and media currently around, this proves very insightful.

That’s it, those are our favourite 10 books. Get started, add your favourite read!

Upcoming Print and Multiple Art Fairs

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on September 3, 2010

After relaxing during August, the Art World makes a come back in September and October hosting a wide variety of events, exhibitions, shows, auctions and fairs; at Rise Art, we have compiled a little list of fairs selling multiples and prints for you during these two upcoming month, which might be interesting for you as artist and enthusiasts or collector alike.

  1. Piccadilly Self Publishing Fair is going to take place in Manchester on 3rd October 2010, followed by an exhibition until 8th October 2010. The fair is going to show around 40 stalls selling multiples, artists books and zines; these stalls are available for individuals and small presses alike. Artists can submit by  sending images of your work, some information about your work and your website – contact caitlinandsophielee@live.co.uk
  2. 20|21 British Art Fair, now in it’s 23rd year, is specialising exclusively in modern and contemporary British art. It is going to take place at the Royal College of Art from 15th to 19th of September 2010.
  3. 6by4 Secret Postcard Exhibition is going to take place from 12th to 14th November 2010 in Art Space Portsmouth. 6by4 is an exhibition and sale of original, postcard-sized artworks, created and donated by a variety of individuals: from established and emerging artists to amateurs originating from all corners of the world. All artists are invited to send submissions. The brief is simple: all entries (max three works per person) must be on card, 6 inches by four inches (15 x 10 cm) in any medium including drawing, painting, photography and collage. There is no entry fee, all funds raised through card sales will support Art Space Portsmouth 30th Anniversary initiatives.
  4. Multiplied is a new Fair initiated by the auction house Christie’s to be held during Frieze Art Fair from 14th to 17th October 2010 in London. We are curious to see what this fair, focusing on prints and multiples, will be like!
  5. Frieze Art Fair also has a section for multiples and prints.
  6. Affordable Art Fair from 21rst to 24th October in London. This Fair has approx. 120 stalls from artists and galleries; works are not allowed to be sold for more than £ 3,000.- It is a fun day out and maybe you find a work you want to take home.

Have you heard of other fairs or initiatives? Let us know and share it with our community!

Writing your Artist CV

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on August 24, 2010

For Artists, the process of keeping an up-to-date CV that promotes your work and showcases both your talent and motivation can be a tricky endeavor. A good CV allows gallerists, collectors, critics as well and the public a quick overview of an artist’s activities, exhibitions and patronage. Often artists find it hard to write about themselves and their projects, especially at the beginning of their career when they are just starting out. Here are some of the things we think are important for every artist to consider when constructing their bio.

Before getting started, consider the following questions:

  1. What is the purpose of this CV? Is it for a gallery, exhibition or profile? Who is the audience and what do they want to learn?
  2. If it is for a submission or application, how is my past experience and work relevant to this project?
  3. What am I proud of and want to make sure I get across in the document?

General Guidelines

  • Keep the lay-out consistent, clear and simple. Use only one, simple typeface, such as Arial or Times New Roman.
  • Keep the information provided concise, clear and simple. Try to limit each point to one or two sentences. Bullets and headers can help streamline projects and exhibitions.
  • Keep your CV short – don’t exceed two A4 pages and if possible one. Instead of lengthy pages of exhibitions, select exhibitions that show your diversity and motivations.
  • Use reverse chronological order, by stating the latest exhibition or education first, working your way backwards.
  • Taylor your CV to the opportunity you are applying for.
  • Put most relevant information first; if you are a recent graduate, you might want to put education first.
  • Include a website URL where possible, so the person reviewing your CV can easily access further information if needed.
  • University of the Arts London has created a helpful pfd on writing CVs in the creative industries, which you can find here.

Headings

  1. Name and Contact Details – In your heading put your name together with your contact details, where and when you were born and where you currently live and work.
  2. Education/Training – start with your most recent education first, working your way to the A-levels.
  3. Solo Exhibitions – This section should contain any solo exhibitions you have had, including the exhibition name, location and year.
  4. Group Exhibitions –  Put in the same information as above. You might want to add the name of the curator, especially if he or she is well-known.
  5. Awards – Have you been shortlisted or won an award? If so, put the details under this heading.
  6. Collections – Has a collector, company or foundation bought your work? If yes, put here the year of purchase, name and location of the collection.
  7. Publications/Published Work – include here information on any publications that have been written about your work; reference the work in an academic manner, for instance by using the Harvard System of Reference.
  8. Residencies – outline any residencies you have been part of, again, include year and name of the residency.
  9. Commissions – detail here any work you have been commissioned to do.
  10. Representation – if represented by a gallery or galleries, put their details here.

Phew, that is a long list of things to consider. Do you feel there are other things to consider or do you have additional advice? Share your thoughts with our community!