Rise Art

Our Pick: Rise Art’s top 5 Gallery Exhibitions of 2010

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on December 15, 2010

The Rise Art Team enjoyed compiling a top 5 museum exhibition list so much (see here) that we have opted to extend our shortlist bring your our top 5 gallery exhibition highlights of 2010. This time, however, given the breadth of gallery shows globally, and our limited time and travel budgets, we have kept the shortlist focused on London based galleries. In no particular order, here are our picks:

Vincent Fecteau at Greengrassi

San-Francisco based Vincent Fecteau might turn into one of the most influential contemporary artists working with formal languages of sculpture. His reference-abounding work was put onto the gallery walls like trophies. Fantastic!

Superunknown at Edel Assanti

This group show curated by Rise Art artist Andy Wicks and David Northedge consisted of twelve artists. Their work addressed a future full of dreams, illusions and fantasies, celebrating the neglected virtues of the glossy, lurid and bizarre. It was a great pleasure seeing so much young talent! Artists included: Michael Ashcroft, MAtthew Atkinson, Gordon Cheung, Sayshun Jay, Graham McNamara, David Northedge, Ed Payne, James Roper, Rob Sherwood, David Small, Andy Wicks and Rosalie Wiesner. We could be a bit biased on this one, but we really enjoyed it.

Noemie Goudal at Hotshoe Gallery

Parisian-born Noemie Goudal is an outstanding newcomer in photography; her show at Hotshoe Gallery displayed her series ‘Les Amants’ – her best so far! Since then she has been shown as part of the Anticipation event at Selfridges and her work is starting to get noticed by collectors outside of the M25. She is on our list of artist to expect big things of in 2011.

Louise Bourgeois at Hauser & Wirth

Haunch of Venison showed works by the late Louise Bourgeois, who passed away earlier this year – aged 98. The show focused on her works with fabric and we thought it was great. The show is on until December 18th – go see it if you have time!

Elaine Sturevant at Anthony Reynolds Gallery

This american artist became renown for playing with the concept of originality and her copies of other artists’ works; this time, it is a film in three acts: ‘Elastic Tango’ – a cosmic dance, perhaps?

I am sure we missed many more great exhibitions in London. What were your favorites?

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Rise Art @ Gallery Primo Alonso – ‘God is in the Details’

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on December 1, 2010

Over the past months Rise Art has been teaming up with galleries and events, supporting artists and curators alike. Currently Rise Art is working in collaboration with  Gallery Primo Alonso to host “God is in the Details” an exhibit which celebrates 13 artists across a variety of media who demonstrate a thorough and meticulous approach to their practice. Co-curators Medeia Cohen-Petrolino and Justin Hammond carefully selected the artists, aiming create a show ‘not just about the beauty that hard work produces, but also about a certain recognition for the technique and the skill involved.’

Among the artists represented are past Catlin Art Prize winner Alex Ball, and Rise Art artist Martin Krolzig. Krolzig was discovered by curator Medeia Cohen-Petrolino while reviewing artist portfolio’s on Rise Art. Said Cohen- Petrolino “Rise Art has been a great place for us to discover artists we wouldn’t normally have exposure to. We are excited to have Martin’s work as part of the exibit”

In celebration of the event, on Thursday, December 2nd at 7pm, Rise Art is hosting a evening reception at London’s Gallery Primo Alonso during which co-curator Justin Hammond and artists will introduce the show and works. The event is open to all by following the below RSVP link.

Event Details and RSVP here

A Guide to Planning your Degree Show

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on November 4, 2010

The degree show representing a crucial moment in an artist’s career, we believe one should plan ahead in order to get the most out of it. Thus at Rise Art, we are writing about it in the middle of November!

Below are a few points worth considering; some might seem obvious, but many times we have missed some or all of these points when visiting shows.

1. Planning, planning, planning

Ensure you receive the precise dates for your final show from your course coordinator or leader as soon as possible. This will provide you with a set time frame in which things need to be done; and it is not only your work that needs to be finished and displayed, but plenty other things should be done, too.

2. Marketing

Many people in the art world enjoy going to degree shows to spot the next talents. In order to ensure they find out about your show, we suggest you undertake some marketing.

Once you know the dates and venue, ask your university or college to advertise the degree show on their website or create your own website with your fellow students. It can be a simple website, or blog, such as wordpress, or sites.google.com. We believe that the following information is relevant:

  • Most importantly, visiting info (including date,venue, opening times, map)
  • Names of all students showing, ideally with a picture of the work and contact details (you might want to extend this and add statements, etc)
  • Provide the details of the courses that are represented at the degree show, such as ‘Fine Art’, ‘Illustration’, ‘Photography’, etc
  • Gather ideas from how others students/universities did this before yourself

3. Promote the Show

To help promote the event, to get the word out there use social media, such as twitter, tumblr or facebook. If these networks are entirely new to you, Mashable explains in an intelligible way how to tackle all of these.

Another or additional way to promote yourself is to prints posters and flyer and to canvas them around town, from pubs and bars to galleries and museums.

4. The degree show itself

Wherever possible, see if you can see the venue in which your work will be displayed as soon as possible to get an idea and feel of the space and how you wish to display your works.

Depending on the venue you might want to consider putting up signage for visitors to help them orientate themselves.

Ensure you have labels and artist statements next to your work. Addionally, have busiensscards available for interested individuals to take away. This is important so people who enjoyed your work can get in touch with you! Ideally, the entire course has the identical lay-out on all the material provided. Further, you might want to consider leaving a book for comments, feedback and contacts on the premiseses.

Try to stay in touch with people who left their contact details for you – by sending them newsletters informing them about upcoming projects and shows.

From your experience, are there other points that need to be raised? Share them with us!

Affordable Art Fair 2010

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on October 27, 2010

As most of you perhaps know by now, Rise Art supported artist Katie Rand during her residency at the Affordable Art Fair. The event was a capital success for Katie: her work gained huge exposure, given that over 20,000 people came to the fair – most of which loved her work! Her business- and post- cards were gone like hot cakes. Finally, Katie won the hearts of future collectors by hosting a fun-tastic workshop for kids, in which they really engaged. Did you have the chance to see Katie’s work? What did you think?

Below a few pictures to round-up the atmosphere at AAF. To see more of our pictures, visit our Flickr profile.Katie’s mouthwatering stand.

The amount of visitors and the abundance of works being purchased.

Katie’s workshop with the kids.

Did you go to the Affordable Art Fair? What did you like best? Which artist or gallery? Share it with our community!

Interview with Katie Rand – Winner of the First Rise Art Emerging Artists Grant

Posted in Interview by Scott @ Rise Art on October 20, 2010

Artist Katie Rand is about to take part in the Affordable Art Fair in Battersea Park from 21-24 October 2010 as an Artist-in-Residence. As the first artist to be selected and supported by Rise Art‘s Emerging Artists Grant programme– we have had the opportunity to ask her about her work and plans, and to introduce her mouth-watering, ephemeral work to our community.

Rise Art: Katie, in advance of your residency at Affordable Art Fair, what should people know about you and your background as an artist?

Katie Rand: I graduated this summer from the Arts University College Bournemouth, with a first class honours. During my time there I was involved in many exhibitions and events. My first London based exhibition was this year, at Free Range. I feel excited and honoured to have been invited to be the Artist-in- Residence this October at the AAF, and to have received Rise Art’s Production Grant to make this possible.

RA: Your choice of working with foods sets you apart form most artists. Why did you choose food as your preferred medium?

K.R.: I ask myself this question everyday! It all started at the end of my first year at University. I became interested in the child psychology, and the psychology of smell. Senses play a fundamental role in our everyday lives, which are often taken for granted. I began to question the way in which we view art. The visual is the obvious choice, and often sound, however smell is quite frequently ignored. How would a viewer react to purely smell and no visual? Would this still be considered art? Though experimentation and process I began to question the olfactory memory. Food became a key material, as it had many associations with childhood. It is a material that challenges my making, the perception of art and ones psychology.

RA: Food, unlike many materials artists use, is not durable but ephemeral – how does that impact on your work?

K.R.: The ephemeral qualities of my work play an important role. My work is often painstakingly tedious. It takes a great deal of time, planning and consideration. It excites me that there is never a permanent trace, apart from a memory or documentation of the work. I don’t like permanence as nothing lasts forever. I always have a starting point and a finishing point during the making process. The removal and destruction of the work is the finishing point. If I don’t reach this position the work is not complete.

RA: Are there any individuals or experiences that have impacted on your work?

K.R.: My work is influenced by so many things; however I am interested and inspired by Minimalism. The formal qualities interest me as does the machismo of the time. I often challenge these through my choice of material and structures, creating a sense of irony.

RA: The work you are doing for your residency at the Affordable Art Fair is a site-specific installation. How did you find the suitable installation for this location? What was your process in deciding what to do?

K.R.: The theme this October at the AAF is ‘Food Glorious Food’. That is why they approached me to be the artist-in-residence as my practice is fitting! I choose to re create (Memory 2008) because I wanted both children and adults to enjoy the work. It is fun, vibrant and interactive, which suits the AAF concept. I worked closely with the Program Manager throughout the decision, as I wanted it to be right for everyone.

RA: You graduated with a BA in Fine Art in 2010; how has the transition from school to being an artist been for you so far?

K.R.: So far so good! My feet are yet to touch the ground! I feel very lucky to have been given such a great opportunity with The Affordable Art Fair, so soon after graduating. Companies such as Rise Art and South West Artwork have been a great support.

RA: Where do you see the direction of your work heading? Do you have any particular plans?

K.R.: I have been offered a place on an MA Fine Art Course in London. I will be looking forward to starting next year. I have a couple of exhibitions lined up for 2011, which I am looking forward to also.

RA: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

K.R.: I have no idea! I know I would like to still be practicing! My life would be incomplete without art.

Katie’s work is viewable at the Affordable Art Fair from 21-24 October. Rise Art is proud to be supporting Katie’s work as Artist-in-Residence, with our new grant scheme enabling emerging artists to finish their projects . We will announce the next opportunity to submit work and be considered for the Rise Art Emerging Artists Grant in the forthcoming weeks – email info@riseart.com to receive further information on the programme.

Collecting: A Beginner’s Guide

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on October 11, 2010

As you are reading this entry, we can assume you are interested in art and enjoy engaging with it. However, the idea of buying art for the first time can seem overwhelming, given the myriad of possibilities; the sheer number of mediums, styles and periods make it difficult to know where to start.

There are no rules prevailing on how to start a collection, other than picking to your taste, which will often naturally form a coherent collection with a conceptual framework over time. As you begin to discover your own interests and begin to build confidence in your taste, this will become much easier.

Why collect Art? Illustration by hjx

Here are a few tips of advice on how you can start getting involved, acquiring your first piece or start a collection:

  1. Buy a work because you enjoy and love it, not because you expect to profit from it.
  2. Shop around for art: Visit as many galleries and museums as you can in order to see what is on offer and discover what you like. Don’t be afraid to ask questions or ask for advice.
  3. Subscribe to gallery newsletters in order to be invited to openings and special events.
  4. Explore outlets: There are not only galleries, but also art fairs, auction houses, degree shows, artists’ studios and online galleries. Art Maps and calendars are generally available at most galleries, listing new shows and previews.
  5. Engage with art. Focus on what an artist is trying to communicate rather than traditional standards of aesthetic.
  6. Read art magazines; we have listed a number we appreciate here.
  7. Do your research: the greater your knowledge, the greater your understanding; the Internet has made it easy to research artists and galleries online.
  8. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Most people working in the arts do so out of passion, so they enjoy talking about art.
  9. Pick the best within your means. Many contemporary artists also create works in limited editions, which are more affordable. Alternatively, seek out younger or lesser-known artists. If price is an issue, seek out regional programs that can help minimize the burden. In England the own art scheme provides collectors with interest free loans for purchases of less than £2000.
  10. Once you have bought a work, look after it. The biggest threats are direct light and humidity. You might event want to consider insurance for Art purchases.

A number of books have been written on how to start a collection, such as Owning Art: The Contemporary Art Collector’s Handbook by Louisa Buck and Judith Greer, The Art of Buying Art: An Insider’s Guide to Collecting Contemporary Art by Paige West or Collecting Contemporary by Adam Lindemann. They cover the basics to get you started, but we believe the best way to learn is by doing it!

What was the first work of art you acquired? How did you do it? Share your experiences with the Rise Art community!

How to survive an Art Fair

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on October 4, 2010

Art Fairs represent an excellent way of seeing what is ‘out there’ in one place. Galleries are gathered to show curated projects or works by their entire stable of artists, allowing visitors to see a wide range of work. Most fairs have a special theme surrounding them, thereby catering for a variety of tastes and interests.

Multiplied, for example, which specialised in showing contemporary prints and multiples. Pinta Art Fair is focusing  on contemporary Latin American Art.  Frieze Art Fair is the most famous London-based contemporary art fair. The Affordable Art Fair is a great way of discovering affordable works of art. Being interested in contemporary art, you will eventually end up attending at least one of these. Given the ever increasing popularity of these events, they can quickly turn into a real frenzy. Having spent a lot of time at fairs, we believe we might have a few useful tips for how to make the best of  a day at an art fair:

  1. Wear comfortable clothes, and ladies, think flats!
  2. Be prepared. Check upfront who is exhibiting and note the stands you really want to see.
  3. Get a map at the entrance to see where you want to head. It is also handy if you have a bad sense of orientation!
  4. Don’t be shy to ask questions to the gallery representative at the stand – that is what they are here for.
  5. Leave your contact details with galleries where you saw works of artists that triggered  your interest, so you will receive invitations to future exhibitions as well as news on the particular artist.
  6. Bring a notepad and pen to capture the names of galleries and/or artists that appealed most to you.
  7. If you are not one of the lucky ones being invited to the preview day, try to avoid rush-hour. Ensure you go at a time and day other people might not be able to.
  8. Do take your time – most art fairs are of considerable size and you want to get most out of it – it is impossible to race through Frieze Art Fair in one or two hours if you want to see work.
  9. Always have some spare change with you, so you can buy yourself some coffee or water at the coffee shop without having to queue for the cash-machine.
  10. Do all of the above and you are in for a wonderful day of discoveries!

Accepted a Commission? Points to consider

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on September 28, 2010

Working on commissions can be a very enriching experience for both, the commissioner and the artist. In order to ensure a smooth collaboration, we have come up with a little list of issues that need to be taken into consideration and agreed on, in order to avoid misunderstandings on both sides.

But first and foremost, it is crucial for you as artist to gain a detailed understanding of what the commissioned piece requires. Thus, communication and discussion are highly important.

As artist, you might want to ask for certain specifications in written form. To avoid misunderstandings, we believe that it is best to set out several details in a written brief,  of which both parties receive a copy.

This agreement should include the following points:

  • It should state details about the commission, such as: Where will it be displayed? Does it serve a particular purpose?
  • Determine the materials to be used.
  • Agree a timescale for the completion of the commission.
  • Payment structure needs to be set. Often, payment is divided in three thirds: the first third is paid upon agreeing on the commission, the second-third is paid half way through the work and the last third once the artwork is finished. However, you may want to structure it differently based on other criteria and milestones.
  • Outline clearly who pays for material as well as productions undertaken by a third party.
  • Define who is responsible for the delivery  and insurance of the artwork? Are there any special transport requirements? Determine the costs and who pays for the delivery.
  • Will the artwork you are creating require installing? If so, who will do this? You as artist? A technician? Can the commissioner install it by himself?
  • Does the artwork need specific requirements for conservation and maintenance? If so, inform your client about it!
  • Ownership & moral rights – you have to come to an agreement of ownership. Some basic texts about copyright can be found here.
  • Finally, it should state the names of the involved parties, and a date.

Here a few examples of agreements/contracts used between a commissioner and artist:

Did you find this post helpful? What are your experience? Share your thoughts with us!

Research Resources: Top 10 London Libraries

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on September 15, 2010

For many artists research is a crucial starting point to the creation of new work. At Rise Art, we compiled a list of London Libraries our team enjoys, maybe there are some among them that you have not heard of yet?

  1. Courtauld Institute of Art Book Library The Art Book Library collection covers the history of art in the western tradition from classical antiquity to date.
  2. Witt Library is an image Library, consisting of a collection of reproductions of western art, after paintings, drawings and prints from 1200 to the present day. It is situated in the Courtauld Institute.
  3. The Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art is an educational charity aiming to promote and support the study of British history of art and architecture. Apart from a library, the centre offers a range of activities, such as lectures, and also grants!
  4. Tate – Archive Journeys is the beginning of the aim to provide online access to parts of its remarkable Archive. These journeys through three themes from the Tate Archive provide a fascinating insight into Tate’s Historythe Bloomsbury Group and the art world of the 1960s and 70s as seen through the eyes of the art critic Barbara Reise. We are looking forward to the further development of these archives!
  5. St Bride Library is also referred to as ‘printing’ library, as its collections cover printing and related subjects, such as paper and binding, graphic design and typography, illustration and printmaking, as well as publishing, book-selling and the social and economic aspects of printing.
  6. National Art Library located at the Victoria & Albert Museum is a major public reference library. Its strength lies in the range and depth of its holdings of documentary material
    concerning the fine and decorative arts of many countries and periods.
  7. The Woman’s Art Library (MAKE) in the Goldsmiths College main purpose is to provide a place for woman artists to deposit unique documentation of their work, thereby facilitating the study of work by women artists.
  8. The World Wide Web Virtual Library: History of Art is a collection of links relating to Art History and computer applications in Art History. The site is sponsored by CHArt, the Computers and History of Art Group. This site is especially focused on the academic study of Art History.
  9. ARLIS UK & Ireland is the professional organisation for people involved in providing library and information services and documenting resources in the visual arts.
  10. The British Library is the most extensive Library in this country.

Which libraries in London or the UK do you enjoy doing your research in? Go ahead, add them to the list and share your experiences!

Upcoming Print and Multiple Art Fairs

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on September 3, 2010

After relaxing during August, the Art World makes a come back in September and October hosting a wide variety of events, exhibitions, shows, auctions and fairs; at Rise Art, we have compiled a little list of fairs selling multiples and prints for you during these two upcoming month, which might be interesting for you as artist and enthusiasts or collector alike.

  1. Piccadilly Self Publishing Fair is going to take place in Manchester on 3rd October 2010, followed by an exhibition until 8th October 2010. The fair is going to show around 40 stalls selling multiples, artists books and zines; these stalls are available for individuals and small presses alike. Artists can submit by  sending images of your work, some information about your work and your website – contact caitlinandsophielee@live.co.uk
  2. 20|21 British Art Fair, now in it’s 23rd year, is specialising exclusively in modern and contemporary British art. It is going to take place at the Royal College of Art from 15th to 19th of September 2010.
  3. 6by4 Secret Postcard Exhibition is going to take place from 12th to 14th November 2010 in Art Space Portsmouth. 6by4 is an exhibition and sale of original, postcard-sized artworks, created and donated by a variety of individuals: from established and emerging artists to amateurs originating from all corners of the world. All artists are invited to send submissions. The brief is simple: all entries (max three works per person) must be on card, 6 inches by four inches (15 x 10 cm) in any medium including drawing, painting, photography and collage. There is no entry fee, all funds raised through card sales will support Art Space Portsmouth 30th Anniversary initiatives.
  4. Multiplied is a new Fair initiated by the auction house Christie’s to be held during Frieze Art Fair from 14th to 17th October 2010 in London. We are curious to see what this fair, focusing on prints and multiples, will be like!
  5. Frieze Art Fair also has a section for multiples and prints.
  6. Affordable Art Fair from 21rst to 24th October in London. This Fair has approx. 120 stalls from artists and galleries; works are not allowed to be sold for more than £ 3,000.- It is a fun day out and maybe you find a work you want to take home.

Have you heard of other fairs or initiatives? Let us know and share it with our community!