Rise Art

Paris Photo Recap: 5 Artists to watch

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on November 24, 2010

The 14th annual photography fair Paris Photo,  took place last week in the Caroussel du Louvre in Central Paris. Showcasing about 100 international galleries and publishers, it gave people an insight into todays most vibrant photographers with a focus on Europe. Most of the artists shown are already fairly established, and we loved the diversity of talent across the fair. Listed below is our take on 5 artists who’s work we believe deserve your attention.

Eric Poitevin born in 1961 in France. Lives and works in France.

We like Eric’s work because the subjects are diverse, but most of his images share a deprivation of sentimentalism, and somehow acquire a timeless universal value. More about this artist here.

Denise Grünstein, born 1956 in Finland. Lives and works in Sweden.

She is one of the more established Swedish photographers, mainly portraying people. Her images are highly recognizable for her unique ability to imprint her own feelings and temperament on film paired. See more of her work here.

Simon Roberts born in 1974 in England. Lives and works in England.

We saw the work below from the series ‘We English’, an exploration of Simon’s memories as a child, where he finds beauty in the mundane. Check out more of Simon’s work here.

Andrew Moore

Moore, trained in architecture as well as photography has a particular eye for seeing cities and buildings. His internationally acclaimed large format colour photography is simply breathtakingly. See his work here.

Joern Vanhoefen. Born 1961 in Germany. Lives and works in Berlin and Maputo.

Vanhoefen has a talent in capturing places from a new perspective – See for yourself, here.

Have you been to Paris Photo or discovered a photographer recently whose work you really enjoyed? Let us know who’s your favorite photographer at the moment.

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Affordable Art Fair 2010

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on October 27, 2010

As most of you perhaps know by now, Rise Art supported artist Katie Rand during her residency at the Affordable Art Fair. The event was a capital success for Katie: her work gained huge exposure, given that over 20,000 people came to the fair – most of which loved her work! Her business- and post- cards were gone like hot cakes. Finally, Katie won the hearts of future collectors by hosting a fun-tastic workshop for kids, in which they really engaged. Did you have the chance to see Katie’s work? What did you think?

Below a few pictures to round-up the atmosphere at AAF. To see more of our pictures, visit our Flickr profile.Katie’s mouthwatering stand.

The amount of visitors and the abundance of works being purchased.

Katie’s workshop with the kids.

Did you go to the Affordable Art Fair? What did you like best? Which artist or gallery? Share it with our community!

Collecting: A Beginner’s Guide

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on October 11, 2010

As you are reading this entry, we can assume you are interested in art and enjoy engaging with it. However, the idea of buying art for the first time can seem overwhelming, given the myriad of possibilities; the sheer number of mediums, styles and periods make it difficult to know where to start.

There are no rules prevailing on how to start a collection, other than picking to your taste, which will often naturally form a coherent collection with a conceptual framework over time. As you begin to discover your own interests and begin to build confidence in your taste, this will become much easier.

Why collect Art? Illustration by hjx

Here are a few tips of advice on how you can start getting involved, acquiring your first piece or start a collection:

  1. Buy a work because you enjoy and love it, not because you expect to profit from it.
  2. Shop around for art: Visit as many galleries and museums as you can in order to see what is on offer and discover what you like. Don’t be afraid to ask questions or ask for advice.
  3. Subscribe to gallery newsletters in order to be invited to openings and special events.
  4. Explore outlets: There are not only galleries, but also art fairs, auction houses, degree shows, artists’ studios and online galleries. Art Maps and calendars are generally available at most galleries, listing new shows and previews.
  5. Engage with art. Focus on what an artist is trying to communicate rather than traditional standards of aesthetic.
  6. Read art magazines; we have listed a number we appreciate here.
  7. Do your research: the greater your knowledge, the greater your understanding; the Internet has made it easy to research artists and galleries online.
  8. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Most people working in the arts do so out of passion, so they enjoy talking about art.
  9. Pick the best within your means. Many contemporary artists also create works in limited editions, which are more affordable. Alternatively, seek out younger or lesser-known artists. If price is an issue, seek out regional programs that can help minimize the burden. In England the own art scheme provides collectors with interest free loans for purchases of less than £2000.
  10. Once you have bought a work, look after it. The biggest threats are direct light and humidity. You might event want to consider insurance for Art purchases.

A number of books have been written on how to start a collection, such as Owning Art: The Contemporary Art Collector’s Handbook by Louisa Buck and Judith Greer, The Art of Buying Art: An Insider’s Guide to Collecting Contemporary Art by Paige West or Collecting Contemporary by Adam Lindemann. They cover the basics to get you started, but we believe the best way to learn is by doing it!

What was the first work of art you acquired? How did you do it? Share your experiences with the Rise Art community!