Rise Art

Early days of photo: 5 sharp Women

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on January 12, 2011

Since the beginning of photography, women have made significant contributions to the medium of photography; below, Rise Art introduces five of these remarkable women, whose work has had an impact on today’s artists.

Claude Cahun (1894-1954)

Lucy Schwob, who later took on the name Claude Cahun as hommage to her great-uncle, was a French artist, encompassing theater, writing and photography. Although she considered herself mainly a quick-change artist, she was an outstanding photographer. With her androgynous name, look  and joy in re-inventing herself, she captured gender issues and played with both, gender and sexuality. Her self-portrayed and self-exposing work strongly influenced later generations of artists such as Cindy Sherman, Sophie Calle or Nan Goldin.

Tina Modotti (1896-1942)

Aged 16, Italian-born model, actress and later photographer Assunta Modotti joined her father in San Francisco. Moving to Los Angeles, she met Edward Weston, who – it is said – taught her photography as a means of documentation and fine art. Together with Weston, Modotti moved to Mexico in 1922, where they quickly integrated into the bohemian circles; among their friends were Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. Five years later, she joined the Communist Party, marking the date in which her work turns more politically motivated and Tina turning into a political activist.

Berenice Abbott (1898-1991)

A pupil of Man Ray’s, Berenice Abbott’s work as portrait-photographer quickly became as sought after as her instructors. Peggy Guggenheim became a client and supporter. After spending a few years in Paris, the American went back to New York, where she created the body of work she is best known for – black and white photography of the city, illustrating the development of technology and society. In addition to these works, she made important contributions to scientific photography, as well as inventing aides for photography, such as the ‘autopole‘.

Lee Miller (1907-1977)

Elizabeth ‘Lee’ Miller, later Lady Penrose was an American born fashion model in New York City before going to Paris to become a successful photographer. Man Ray was her mentor and lover. It is said she helped Man Ray discover the process of ‘solarisation‘ in photography (look at the portrait of Lee Miller above), thereby contributing its further development. Not only was she an acclaimed fashion and portrait photographer, but also one of the few women who documented events such as the liberation of Paris and the London Blitz as well as concentration camps.

Inge Morath (1923-2002)

Austrian-born Inge Morath was among the first female members of Magnum Photos, which to this date remains male dominated.  Morath married the playwright Arthur Miller and relocated permanently to the States. Among her most important achievements in photography are her portraits, as she created the idea of taking people in intimate settings. Philip Roth, a writer and one of her subjects, describer Morath as ‘the most engaging, sprightly, seemingly harmless voyeur I know.’


Our Pick: Rise Art’s top 5 Gallery Exhibitions of 2010

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on December 15, 2010

The Rise Art Team enjoyed compiling a top 5 museum exhibition list so much (see here) that we have opted to extend our shortlist bring your our top 5 gallery exhibition highlights of 2010. This time, however, given the breadth of gallery shows globally, and our limited time and travel budgets, we have kept the shortlist focused on London based galleries. In no particular order, here are our picks:

Vincent Fecteau at Greengrassi

San-Francisco based Vincent Fecteau might turn into one of the most influential contemporary artists working with formal languages of sculpture. His reference-abounding work was put onto the gallery walls like trophies. Fantastic!

Superunknown at Edel Assanti

This group show curated by Rise Art artist Andy Wicks and David Northedge consisted of twelve artists. Their work addressed a future full of dreams, illusions and fantasies, celebrating the neglected virtues of the glossy, lurid and bizarre. It was a great pleasure seeing so much young talent! Artists included: Michael Ashcroft, MAtthew Atkinson, Gordon Cheung, Sayshun Jay, Graham McNamara, David Northedge, Ed Payne, James Roper, Rob Sherwood, David Small, Andy Wicks and Rosalie Wiesner. We could be a bit biased on this one, but we really enjoyed it.

Noemie Goudal at Hotshoe Gallery

Parisian-born Noemie Goudal is an outstanding newcomer in photography; her show at Hotshoe Gallery displayed her series ‘Les Amants’ – her best so far! Since then she has been shown as part of the Anticipation event at Selfridges and her work is starting to get noticed by collectors outside of the M25. She is on our list of artist to expect big things of in 2011.

Louise Bourgeois at Hauser & Wirth

Haunch of Venison showed works by the late Louise Bourgeois, who passed away earlier this year – aged 98. The show focused on her works with fabric and we thought it was great. The show is on until December 18th – go see it if you have time!

Elaine Sturevant at Anthony Reynolds Gallery

This american artist became renown for playing with the concept of originality and her copies of other artists’ works; this time, it is a film in three acts: ‘Elastic Tango’ – a cosmic dance, perhaps?

I am sure we missed many more great exhibitions in London. What were your favorites?

Paris Photo Recap: 5 Artists to watch

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on November 24, 2010

The 14th annual photography fair Paris Photo,  took place last week in the Caroussel du Louvre in Central Paris. Showcasing about 100 international galleries and publishers, it gave people an insight into todays most vibrant photographers with a focus on Europe. Most of the artists shown are already fairly established, and we loved the diversity of talent across the fair. Listed below is our take on 5 artists who’s work we believe deserve your attention.

Eric Poitevin born in 1961 in France. Lives and works in France.

We like Eric’s work because the subjects are diverse, but most of his images share a deprivation of sentimentalism, and somehow acquire a timeless universal value. More about this artist here.

Denise Grünstein, born 1956 in Finland. Lives and works in Sweden.

She is one of the more established Swedish photographers, mainly portraying people. Her images are highly recognizable for her unique ability to imprint her own feelings and temperament on film paired. See more of her work here.

Simon Roberts born in 1974 in England. Lives and works in England.

We saw the work below from the series ‘We English’, an exploration of Simon’s memories as a child, where he finds beauty in the mundane. Check out more of Simon’s work here.

Andrew Moore

Moore, trained in architecture as well as photography has a particular eye for seeing cities and buildings. His internationally acclaimed large format colour photography is simply breathtakingly. See his work here.

Joern Vanhoefen. Born 1961 in Germany. Lives and works in Berlin and Maputo.

Vanhoefen has a talent in capturing places from a new perspective – See for yourself, here.

Have you been to Paris Photo or discovered a photographer recently whose work you really enjoyed? Let us know who’s your favorite photographer at the moment.