Rise Art

Early days of photo: 5 sharp Women

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on January 12, 2011

Since the beginning of photography, women have made significant contributions to the medium of photography; below, Rise Art introduces five of these remarkable women, whose work has had an impact on today’s artists.

Claude Cahun (1894-1954)

Lucy Schwob, who later took on the name Claude Cahun as hommage to her great-uncle, was a French artist, encompassing theater, writing and photography. Although she considered herself mainly a quick-change artist, she was an outstanding photographer. With her androgynous name, look  and joy in re-inventing herself, she captured gender issues and played with both, gender and sexuality. Her self-portrayed and self-exposing work strongly influenced later generations of artists such as Cindy Sherman, Sophie Calle or Nan Goldin.

Tina Modotti (1896-1942)

Aged 16, Italian-born model, actress and later photographer Assunta Modotti joined her father in San Francisco. Moving to Los Angeles, she met Edward Weston, who – it is said – taught her photography as a means of documentation and fine art. Together with Weston, Modotti moved to Mexico in 1922, where they quickly integrated into the bohemian circles; among their friends were Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. Five years later, she joined the Communist Party, marking the date in which her work turns more politically motivated and Tina turning into a political activist.

Berenice Abbott (1898-1991)

A pupil of Man Ray’s, Berenice Abbott’s work as portrait-photographer quickly became as sought after as her instructors. Peggy Guggenheim became a client and supporter. After spending a few years in Paris, the American went back to New York, where she created the body of work she is best known for – black and white photography of the city, illustrating the development of technology and society. In addition to these works, she made important contributions to scientific photography, as well as inventing aides for photography, such as the ‘autopole‘.

Lee Miller (1907-1977)

Elizabeth ‘Lee’ Miller, later Lady Penrose was an American born fashion model in New York City before going to Paris to become a successful photographer. Man Ray was her mentor and lover. It is said she helped Man Ray discover the process of ‘solarisation‘ in photography (look at the portrait of Lee Miller above), thereby contributing its further development. Not only was she an acclaimed fashion and portrait photographer, but also one of the few women who documented events such as the liberation of Paris and the London Blitz as well as concentration camps.

Inge Morath (1923-2002)

Austrian-born Inge Morath was among the first female members of Magnum Photos, which to this date remains male dominated.  Morath married the playwright Arthur Miller and relocated permanently to the States. Among her most important achievements in photography are her portraits, as she created the idea of taking people in intimate settings. Philip Roth, a writer and one of her subjects, describer Morath as ‘the most engaging, sprightly, seemingly harmless voyeur I know.’


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10 Art Events to visit in 2011

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on December 22, 2010

With 201o coming to a close, the Rise Art team is looking ahead to 2011, and planning our schedules around some of next years more intriguing art events. Rise Art will be attending the London staples including the London Art Fair, and Frieze, but our team is particularly excited about these 10 events in London and beyond.

Future Map 10 (13 January – 6 February 2011)

Now in its thirteenth year, Future Map has built a reputation for showcasing a wide variety of great artwork. Featuring works from graduating artists and designers from University of the Arts London this will become an intriguing interactive show, featuring performance, participation, sculpture and installation. Future Map 10 is hosted by the Zabludowicz Collection.

Florence Trust Winter Open Studios (21 – 23 January 2011)

The Florence Trust provides a group of carefully selected artists with the opportunity to work at their studios for one year, encouraging them to push boundaries of their work and to explore new ideas. Housed in an inspiring Grade 1 listed Victorian church the trust opens its doors twice a year for visitors to see the works in progress by the artists-in-residence, most of whom are very promising. Additionally, it will provide us with the opportunity to see new work by Rise Art Artist Andy Wicks. Our tip: Bring a coat – it gets cold in there this time of year.

ARCO Madrid (16 – 20 February 2011)

Celebrating its 30th anniversary in 2011, ARCO Madrid is going to focus on Russian Contemporary Art this year – something the Rise Art Team is looking forward to discovering!

Armory Show (3 – 6 March 2011)

Visiting the Armory Show in New York is a highlight every year, as it is one of the most established and most exiting art fairs out there, showcasing cutting-edge contemporary art. In addition, as with every fair, there will be plenty of exiting events surrounding the fair. Definitely one of the highlights!

Select (11 – 15 May 2011)

Select Art Fair is going to take place for the first time this year; it promises carefully vetted galleries, artist collectives as well as a curated display of artwork by recent graduates. The Vetting Committee will consist of Andrew Renton, Lisa Le Feuvre, Charlotte Appleyard and Justin Hammond. Another distinguished feature of this fair will be their limit on pricing: no work is allowed to sell for more than £ 5.000,- .

Art HK ( 26 – 29 May 2011)

Hong Kong being a established hub for global commerce and art, it seems only natural that a large contemporary art fair would spring up here sooner or later. Now in its  3rd year as a global event, Art HK has attracted the attention of the art world, with many major galleries on hand. With an emphasis on Asian art and collections, this fair may balance well against the other global fairs.

Venice Biennale (4 June – 27 November 2011)

In its 54th edition, the Venice Biennale will be directed by Bice Curiger – currently curator at Zuerich Kunsthaus and editor-in-chief at Parkett Magazine. The Biennale is entitled ‘Illuminations’. This biennale is well worth the visit for any collector or art enthusiast.

Art Basel (15 – 19 June 2011)

Similar to Frieze and the Armory, Art Basel is one of the global art events that serious collectors are sure to attend. We have included Art Basel on the list because this show is really where modern collecting and the boom of art events began. Perhaps the most established and renowned art fair in the world, Art Basel features over 300 galleries from across the world.

Multiplied (13 – 16 October 2011)

Held simultaneously with Frieze Art FairMultiplied is a new fair hosted by the auction house Christie’s focusing on original artworks in limited edition. In many ways, we found 2010’s first edition to be more interesting than Frieze, with a host of UK and international exhibitors showcasing original prints from leading artists. For the budding collector, this event offers a unique entrance into collecting.

Paris Photo (17 – 20 November 2011)

After having enjoyed Paris Photo so much this year, we cannot wait to go back in 2011. Paris Photo in our opinion is becoming the must see photo event of the year.

In addition to all these events, the Rise Art Team is also always looking forward to the Degree Shows taking place in Summer; dates have not yet been released, but lets hope we will find them on here. Some of our favourite degree shows last year were Slade School of ArtRoyal College of Art,Goldsmith and Freerange – which boosts a variety of shows from graduating artists around the UK.

Which art events are you looking forward to in 2011?

Paris Photo Recap: 5 Artists to watch

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on November 24, 2010

The 14th annual photography fair Paris Photo,  took place last week in the Caroussel du Louvre in Central Paris. Showcasing about 100 international galleries and publishers, it gave people an insight into todays most vibrant photographers with a focus on Europe. Most of the artists shown are already fairly established, and we loved the diversity of talent across the fair. Listed below is our take on 5 artists who’s work we believe deserve your attention.

Eric Poitevin born in 1961 in France. Lives and works in France.

We like Eric’s work because the subjects are diverse, but most of his images share a deprivation of sentimentalism, and somehow acquire a timeless universal value. More about this artist here.

Denise Grünstein, born 1956 in Finland. Lives and works in Sweden.

She is one of the more established Swedish photographers, mainly portraying people. Her images are highly recognizable for her unique ability to imprint her own feelings and temperament on film paired. See more of her work here.

Simon Roberts born in 1974 in England. Lives and works in England.

We saw the work below from the series ‘We English’, an exploration of Simon’s memories as a child, where he finds beauty in the mundane. Check out more of Simon’s work here.

Andrew Moore

Moore, trained in architecture as well as photography has a particular eye for seeing cities and buildings. His internationally acclaimed large format colour photography is simply breathtakingly. See his work here.

Joern Vanhoefen. Born 1961 in Germany. Lives and works in Berlin and Maputo.

Vanhoefen has a talent in capturing places from a new perspective – See for yourself, here.

Have you been to Paris Photo or discovered a photographer recently whose work you really enjoyed? Let us know who’s your favorite photographer at the moment.

Collecting: A Beginner’s Guide

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on October 11, 2010

As you are reading this entry, we can assume you are interested in art and enjoy engaging with it. However, the idea of buying art for the first time can seem overwhelming, given the myriad of possibilities; the sheer number of mediums, styles and periods make it difficult to know where to start.

There are no rules prevailing on how to start a collection, other than picking to your taste, which will often naturally form a coherent collection with a conceptual framework over time. As you begin to discover your own interests and begin to build confidence in your taste, this will become much easier.

Why collect Art? Illustration by hjx

Here are a few tips of advice on how you can start getting involved, acquiring your first piece or start a collection:

  1. Buy a work because you enjoy and love it, not because you expect to profit from it.
  2. Shop around for art: Visit as many galleries and museums as you can in order to see what is on offer and discover what you like. Don’t be afraid to ask questions or ask for advice.
  3. Subscribe to gallery newsletters in order to be invited to openings and special events.
  4. Explore outlets: There are not only galleries, but also art fairs, auction houses, degree shows, artists’ studios and online galleries. Art Maps and calendars are generally available at most galleries, listing new shows and previews.
  5. Engage with art. Focus on what an artist is trying to communicate rather than traditional standards of aesthetic.
  6. Read art magazines; we have listed a number we appreciate here.
  7. Do your research: the greater your knowledge, the greater your understanding; the Internet has made it easy to research artists and galleries online.
  8. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Most people working in the arts do so out of passion, so they enjoy talking about art.
  9. Pick the best within your means. Many contemporary artists also create works in limited editions, which are more affordable. Alternatively, seek out younger or lesser-known artists. If price is an issue, seek out regional programs that can help minimize the burden. In England the own art scheme provides collectors with interest free loans for purchases of less than £2000.
  10. Once you have bought a work, look after it. The biggest threats are direct light and humidity. You might event want to consider insurance for Art purchases.

A number of books have been written on how to start a collection, such as Owning Art: The Contemporary Art Collector’s Handbook by Louisa Buck and Judith Greer, The Art of Buying Art: An Insider’s Guide to Collecting Contemporary Art by Paige West or Collecting Contemporary by Adam Lindemann. They cover the basics to get you started, but we believe the best way to learn is by doing it!

What was the first work of art you acquired? How did you do it? Share your experiences with the Rise Art community!

How to survive an Art Fair

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on October 4, 2010

Art Fairs represent an excellent way of seeing what is ‘out there’ in one place. Galleries are gathered to show curated projects or works by their entire stable of artists, allowing visitors to see a wide range of work. Most fairs have a special theme surrounding them, thereby catering for a variety of tastes and interests.

Multiplied, for example, which specialised in showing contemporary prints and multiples. Pinta Art Fair is focusing  on contemporary Latin American Art.  Frieze Art Fair is the most famous London-based contemporary art fair. The Affordable Art Fair is a great way of discovering affordable works of art. Being interested in contemporary art, you will eventually end up attending at least one of these. Given the ever increasing popularity of these events, they can quickly turn into a real frenzy. Having spent a lot of time at fairs, we believe we might have a few useful tips for how to make the best of  a day at an art fair:

  1. Wear comfortable clothes, and ladies, think flats!
  2. Be prepared. Check upfront who is exhibiting and note the stands you really want to see.
  3. Get a map at the entrance to see where you want to head. It is also handy if you have a bad sense of orientation!
  4. Don’t be shy to ask questions to the gallery representative at the stand – that is what they are here for.
  5. Leave your contact details with galleries where you saw works of artists that triggered  your interest, so you will receive invitations to future exhibitions as well as news on the particular artist.
  6. Bring a notepad and pen to capture the names of galleries and/or artists that appealed most to you.
  7. If you are not one of the lucky ones being invited to the preview day, try to avoid rush-hour. Ensure you go at a time and day other people might not be able to.
  8. Do take your time – most art fairs are of considerable size and you want to get most out of it – it is impossible to race through Frieze Art Fair in one or two hours if you want to see work.
  9. Always have some spare change with you, so you can buy yourself some coffee or water at the coffee shop without having to queue for the cash-machine.
  10. Do all of the above and you are in for a wonderful day of discoveries!

Our team’s 10 favourite books on Art, it’s History and Market

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on September 21, 2010

With the great amount of books and publications on art available, it might at first seem hard to navigate around and find a good entry point into the subject. Thus, the Rise Art Team has decided to share our top 10 books on art, art history and the art market with you. We would love for everyone to add their favourite book to the post, in order to generate an extensive collection of titles.

Our top 10, in no particular order:

  1. The Story of Art – E. H. Gombrich. This highly regarded work provides a comprehensive overview of the history of Western art; it is a great classic by one of the most significant art historians Sir Ernst Gombrich.
  2. Seven Days in the Art World – Sarah Thornton. The author illustrates the contemporary art world with seven important events at the high end of the realm. Informative and entertaining.
  3. The Intrepid Art Collector – Lisa Hunter. This informative guide represents a great starter reference for the novice, giving confidence on starting a very on little collection.
  4. From Manet to Manhattan – Peter Watson. An excellent book providing a good overview of the development of the current art market. However, having been written in 1992, at the time the art market started to boom, it would be great to get an update on today’s status.
  5. The $12 Million Stuffed Shark – Don Thompson. If there is an update on the contemporary art market, it is this one.
  6. Davenport’s Art Reference and Price Guide – Book and CD-ROM. This is the standard artist directory containing information on over 320,000 international artists, including their biography and pricing information.
  7. The Art of the Steal – Christopher Mason. An account of the big price-fixing scandal by two major auction houses: Christie’s and Sotheby’s. If involved in the art world, you should know about it; further, it really helps understanding the auction business.
  8. The Power of Art – Simon Schama Originally a TV series of the BBC, it was later turned into a book and is an incredibly accessible read; the author’s passion for the subject comes through, making it a very enjoyable read.
  9. The Art Crowd – Sophy Burnham. Illustrates the art scene very well; it might have been written a while ago, but is still accurate.
  10. Styles, schools and Movements – Amy Dempsey. An encyclopaedic guide to modern art. With all the styles and media currently around, this proves very insightful.

That’s it, those are our favourite 10 books. Get started, add your favourite read!

Research Resources: Top 10 London Libraries

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on September 15, 2010

For many artists research is a crucial starting point to the creation of new work. At Rise Art, we compiled a list of London Libraries our team enjoys, maybe there are some among them that you have not heard of yet?

  1. Courtauld Institute of Art Book Library The Art Book Library collection covers the history of art in the western tradition from classical antiquity to date.
  2. Witt Library is an image Library, consisting of a collection of reproductions of western art, after paintings, drawings and prints from 1200 to the present day. It is situated in the Courtauld Institute.
  3. The Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art is an educational charity aiming to promote and support the study of British history of art and architecture. Apart from a library, the centre offers a range of activities, such as lectures, and also grants!
  4. Tate – Archive Journeys is the beginning of the aim to provide online access to parts of its remarkable Archive. These journeys through three themes from the Tate Archive provide a fascinating insight into Tate’s Historythe Bloomsbury Group and the art world of the 1960s and 70s as seen through the eyes of the art critic Barbara Reise. We are looking forward to the further development of these archives!
  5. St Bride Library is also referred to as ‘printing’ library, as its collections cover printing and related subjects, such as paper and binding, graphic design and typography, illustration and printmaking, as well as publishing, book-selling and the social and economic aspects of printing.
  6. National Art Library located at the Victoria & Albert Museum is a major public reference library. Its strength lies in the range and depth of its holdings of documentary material
    concerning the fine and decorative arts of many countries and periods.
  7. The Woman’s Art Library (MAKE) in the Goldsmiths College main purpose is to provide a place for woman artists to deposit unique documentation of their work, thereby facilitating the study of work by women artists.
  8. The World Wide Web Virtual Library: History of Art is a collection of links relating to Art History and computer applications in Art History. The site is sponsored by CHArt, the Computers and History of Art Group. This site is especially focused on the academic study of Art History.
  9. ARLIS UK & Ireland is the professional organisation for people involved in providing library and information services and documenting resources in the visual arts.
  10. The British Library is the most extensive Library in this country.

Which libraries in London or the UK do you enjoy doing your research in? Go ahead, add them to the list and share your experiences!

Upcoming Print and Multiple Art Fairs

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on September 3, 2010

After relaxing during August, the Art World makes a come back in September and October hosting a wide variety of events, exhibitions, shows, auctions and fairs; at Rise Art, we have compiled a little list of fairs selling multiples and prints for you during these two upcoming month, which might be interesting for you as artist and enthusiasts or collector alike.

  1. Piccadilly Self Publishing Fair is going to take place in Manchester on 3rd October 2010, followed by an exhibition until 8th October 2010. The fair is going to show around 40 stalls selling multiples, artists books and zines; these stalls are available for individuals and small presses alike. Artists can submit by  sending images of your work, some information about your work and your website – contact caitlinandsophielee@live.co.uk
  2. 20|21 British Art Fair, now in it’s 23rd year, is specialising exclusively in modern and contemporary British art. It is going to take place at the Royal College of Art from 15th to 19th of September 2010.
  3. 6by4 Secret Postcard Exhibition is going to take place from 12th to 14th November 2010 in Art Space Portsmouth. 6by4 is an exhibition and sale of original, postcard-sized artworks, created and donated by a variety of individuals: from established and emerging artists to amateurs originating from all corners of the world. All artists are invited to send submissions. The brief is simple: all entries (max three works per person) must be on card, 6 inches by four inches (15 x 10 cm) in any medium including drawing, painting, photography and collage. There is no entry fee, all funds raised through card sales will support Art Space Portsmouth 30th Anniversary initiatives.
  4. Multiplied is a new Fair initiated by the auction house Christie’s to be held during Frieze Art Fair from 14th to 17th October 2010 in London. We are curious to see what this fair, focusing on prints and multiples, will be like!
  5. Frieze Art Fair also has a section for multiples and prints.
  6. Affordable Art Fair from 21rst to 24th October in London. This Fair has approx. 120 stalls from artists and galleries; works are not allowed to be sold for more than £ 3,000.- It is a fun day out and maybe you find a work you want to take home.

Have you heard of other fairs or initiatives? Let us know and share it with our community!

Rise Art picks: 8 essential art material retailers

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on July 30, 2010

As an artist, shopping for supplies can be a bit of a mixed-bag. While it can be exciting and open up new avenues for creativity, it also can be a bit of a drag. The cost of supplies, indecision over selection, and drag of hauling everything back to the studio can leave anyone thinking twice about a trip to the art store.

If you are going to go through all of the hassle of getting new supplies, at least the experience should be fun. Here are our selection of some of the best places in the UK to purchase new supplies.

1. Cowling and Wilcox – London

This smart art supplier has three stores in London, East, South and West. Our team enjoys popping in to the store on Shoreditch High Street to browse and if we are honest, dream a bit about all the stuff we’d like to buy. According to their website, the South London branch is the biggest art supply store south of the river. We have been pushed not to find what we were looking for here.

2. Atlantis Art – London

This East London based arts and crafts material store is one of London’s leading suppliers. Most materials can be found here – in professional and student quality. We have heard rumors of less than friendly service from the staff. If this has you thinking twice, try their mail-order service as an alternative, or make a day trip out of it, and seek relief at the nearby Whitechapel Gallery.

3. Cass Art – London

In our experience, Cass Art offers excellent service next to a wide range of professional art materials, including a large variety of papers – and all their stores are open 7 days a week! The flagship store in Islington is worth a look.

4. Ashley Studio – Wells-next-the Sea, East Anglia

This little studio, established in 1979, simply needs a mention! It is actually Hazel Ashley’s artist studio. However, a comprehensive range of artist materials is on sale and if you are lucky, you might get to meet other artists from the area! If you are in the area, it is worth a look – No public website to the best of our knowledge. But we do have the address: 19, Staithe Street, Wells-next-the-Sea, NR23 1AG.

5. The Art Shop – Rutland, East Midlands

We like the Art Shop for its knowledgeable and remarkably helpful staff! Moreover, the art shop supports students and students with valid ID receive a discount on their entire purchase.

6. Ward’s Arts and Craft – Gateshead – North East

This store has been around for over 150 years; it is one of the leading arts and crafts suppliers in the north of England. Additionally, this store offers a professional photography and reproduction lab. A great store to loose yourself in.

7. Greyfriars Art Shop – Edinburgh – Scotland

Another classic artist supply store, Greyfriars was established in 1840. The store specializes in painter supplies, and is geared towards the serious artist, given their proximity to local universities. They offer a student discount, and have a knowledgeable and supporting staff. Can get very crowded at times!

8. The Art Shop – Abergavenny, Wales

This rather young concept store is housed in a renovated 16th century building. On the ground floor is an great variety of art and crafts materials available, as well as books. The first floor and basement house galleries with a regularly changing programme. Launching an internet sales channel in the near future as well.

What have we missed? Let us know your thoughts in the comments!

UK Art Prizes, Part I

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on June 10, 2010

The art world in London and beyond is full of various awards and prizes aimed at helping artists raise their profile and support the production of their artwork. Given that Rise Art has been developed to help showcase and endorse emerging artists, we are naturally supportive of art awards that showcase & support emerging talent. Over the next few months, we will explore some of the better know art prizes around town & beyond, five at a time. In no particular order, here are five we like around the UK.

Catlin Art Prize

This is a prize one cannot register for, but you need to be an art student and recommended by a course leader or curator – so ask your course leader to recommend you! Of all artists recommended, 40 are featured in the Catlin Art Guide, 8 of which will be commissioned to do work for an exhibition in London. This provides artists with time to create a new body of work and to explore ideas. One of the artists is finally awarded with the Catlin Art Prize a prize of £3,000.

Taylor Wessing Photography Prize

This prize aims to present the best works in contemporary portrait photography. The show is held at the National Portrait Gallery and then tours the country. Taylor Wessing Photography Prize is open to anyone over 18 from amateur photographers to professionals. First prize is £ 12,000. Submission deadline 18 July 2010 and there is no submission fee.

Threadneedle Prize

The Threadneedle Prize is one of the largest art prizes in the UK. It aims to uncover the best new figurative and representational art in Britain. There are two separate registration deadlines: one for paintings and two-dimensional work and one for sculptures and other three-dimensional work. Registration is £ 15 per work submitted and artists must be over 18 years old. The winner receives £ 25,000, runner-ups £ 1,000. New is the visitor choice award, which is worth £ 10,000.

Jerwood Visual Arts

Jerwood Visual Arts is a major initiative of Jerwood Charitable Foundation. It is a programme of awards, exhibitions and events for talented emerging artist across a variety of disciplines: drawing, painting, photography, moving image and sculpture. Works are displayed in group-shows and several artists of each discipline will be selected. The deadline for the drawing prize is on 21 June.

Brighton Photo Fringe

Brighton Photo Fringe represents an opportunity for emerging and mid-career artists working in lens-based media. Selected artists will receive a fee, a solo exhibition as part of Brighton Photo Fringe and a production budget. Submission fee is £ 15.

Have any questions? Have we got it wrong? Let us know in the comments!