Rise Art

Our Pick: Rise Art’s top 5 Gallery Exhibitions of 2010

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on December 15, 2010

The Rise Art Team enjoyed compiling a top 5 museum exhibition list so much (see here) that we have opted to extend our shortlist bring your our top 5 gallery exhibition highlights of 2010. This time, however, given the breadth of gallery shows globally, and our limited time and travel budgets, we have kept the shortlist focused on London based galleries. In no particular order, here are our picks:

Vincent Fecteau at Greengrassi

San-Francisco based Vincent Fecteau might turn into one of the most influential contemporary artists working with formal languages of sculpture. His reference-abounding work was put onto the gallery walls like trophies. Fantastic!

Superunknown at Edel Assanti

This group show curated by Rise Art artist Andy Wicks and David Northedge consisted of twelve artists. Their work addressed a future full of dreams, illusions and fantasies, celebrating the neglected virtues of the glossy, lurid and bizarre. It was a great pleasure seeing so much young talent! Artists included: Michael Ashcroft, MAtthew Atkinson, Gordon Cheung, Sayshun Jay, Graham McNamara, David Northedge, Ed Payne, James Roper, Rob Sherwood, David Small, Andy Wicks and Rosalie Wiesner. We could be a bit biased on this one, but we really enjoyed it.

Noemie Goudal at Hotshoe Gallery

Parisian-born Noemie Goudal is an outstanding newcomer in photography; her show at Hotshoe Gallery displayed her series ‘Les Amants’ – her best so far! Since then she has been shown as part of the Anticipation event at Selfridges and her work is starting to get noticed by collectors outside of the M25. She is on our list of artist to expect big things of in 2011.

Louise Bourgeois at Hauser & Wirth

Haunch of Venison showed works by the late Louise Bourgeois, who passed away earlier this year – aged 98. The show focused on her works with fabric and we thought it was great. The show is on until December 18th – go see it if you have time!

Elaine Sturevant at Anthony Reynolds Gallery

This american artist became renown for playing with the concept of originality and her copies of other artists’ works; this time, it is a film in three acts: ‘Elastic Tango’ – a cosmic dance, perhaps?

I am sure we missed many more great exhibitions in London. What were your favorites?

Our Pick: The top 5 Museum Exhibitions in 2010

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on December 8, 2010

As the end of the year nears, the Rise Art Team has picked our top 5 exhibition across the global museum landscape in 2010. Some of them run into 2011 and we highly recommend to go see them, if you are around. Here they are:

100 Years (version 2) at Moma PS1, New York City

November 1, 2009 – May 3, 2010

In collaboration with Performa, P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center created 100 Years (version #2, ps1, nov 2009), an exhibition presenting influential moments in the past century of performance art history.With over 200 works including film, photography, documents, and audio, the exhibition presented a wealth of information that is largely unknown and is intended as an archive for students, scholars, and enthusiasts of the history of performance art. It provided an excellent overview and insight.

Anish Kapoor: Turning the World Upside down at Kensington Gardens, London

September 28, 2010 – March 13, 2011

This exhibition organised by Serpentine Gallery and The Royal Parks showcases major recent works by London-based artist Anish Kapoor, The sculptures are sited to contrast and reflect the changing colours, foliage and weather in Kensington Gardens – creating stunning effects. The distortions in the works’ mirror-like surfaces call into question the viewers’ relationship to both the work itself and the surrounding environment. We found it a beautiful and unexpected way to enjoy the park.

1989. End of History or Beginning of the Future? at Kunsthalle, Vienna

October 9, 2009 – February 7, 2010

In 1989, the opening of the Iron Curtain marked the end of the Cold War and created an entirely novel geopolitical and mass-psychological situation. 20 years later, this exhibition investigated the metaphors connected with the collapse of the bipolar division of the world into East and West and the political upheaval, metaphors that are more than ever of relevance for a wide variety of different spheres of life.


André Kertész at Jeu de Paume, Paris

September 28, 2010 – February 6, 2011

During our stay in Paris to visit Paris Photo, we visited the exhibition of the photographer André Kertész. This comprehensive retrospective is the most extensive so far on show in Europe and definitely worth a visit, as his work is outstanding and plays an important part in the development of photography as an art form.


Neo Rauch – Companion at both,Museum of Fine Arts, Leibzig and Pinakothek, Munich

April 18 – August 15, 2010


For the painter’s 50th birthday, both museums organised his first major retrospective. Rauch, from the Leipzig Academy of Visual Arts is one of Germany’s most popular contemporary artists. Both shows, which offered a comprehensive look at his works since 1993 featured many works from private collection and unknown to the public until then.

How to survive an Art Fair

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on October 4, 2010

Art Fairs represent an excellent way of seeing what is ‘out there’ in one place. Galleries are gathered to show curated projects or works by their entire stable of artists, allowing visitors to see a wide range of work. Most fairs have a special theme surrounding them, thereby catering for a variety of tastes and interests.

Multiplied, for example, which specialised in showing contemporary prints and multiples. Pinta Art Fair is focusing  on contemporary Latin American Art.  Frieze Art Fair is the most famous London-based contemporary art fair. The Affordable Art Fair is a great way of discovering affordable works of art. Being interested in contemporary art, you will eventually end up attending at least one of these. Given the ever increasing popularity of these events, they can quickly turn into a real frenzy. Having spent a lot of time at fairs, we believe we might have a few useful tips for how to make the best of  a day at an art fair:

  1. Wear comfortable clothes, and ladies, think flats!
  2. Be prepared. Check upfront who is exhibiting and note the stands you really want to see.
  3. Get a map at the entrance to see where you want to head. It is also handy if you have a bad sense of orientation!
  4. Don’t be shy to ask questions to the gallery representative at the stand – that is what they are here for.
  5. Leave your contact details with galleries where you saw works of artists that triggered  your interest, so you will receive invitations to future exhibitions as well as news on the particular artist.
  6. Bring a notepad and pen to capture the names of galleries and/or artists that appealed most to you.
  7. If you are not one of the lucky ones being invited to the preview day, try to avoid rush-hour. Ensure you go at a time and day other people might not be able to.
  8. Do take your time – most art fairs are of considerable size and you want to get most out of it – it is impossible to race through Frieze Art Fair in one or two hours if you want to see work.
  9. Always have some spare change with you, so you can buy yourself some coffee or water at the coffee shop without having to queue for the cash-machine.
  10. Do all of the above and you are in for a wonderful day of discoveries!

Our team’s 10 favourite books on Art, it’s History and Market

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on September 21, 2010

With the great amount of books and publications on art available, it might at first seem hard to navigate around and find a good entry point into the subject. Thus, the Rise Art Team has decided to share our top 10 books on art, art history and the art market with you. We would love for everyone to add their favourite book to the post, in order to generate an extensive collection of titles.

Our top 10, in no particular order:

  1. The Story of Art – E. H. Gombrich. This highly regarded work provides a comprehensive overview of the history of Western art; it is a great classic by one of the most significant art historians Sir Ernst Gombrich.
  2. Seven Days in the Art World – Sarah Thornton. The author illustrates the contemporary art world with seven important events at the high end of the realm. Informative and entertaining.
  3. The Intrepid Art Collector – Lisa Hunter. This informative guide represents a great starter reference for the novice, giving confidence on starting a very on little collection.
  4. From Manet to Manhattan – Peter Watson. An excellent book providing a good overview of the development of the current art market. However, having been written in 1992, at the time the art market started to boom, it would be great to get an update on today’s status.
  5. The $12 Million Stuffed Shark – Don Thompson. If there is an update on the contemporary art market, it is this one.
  6. Davenport’s Art Reference and Price Guide – Book and CD-ROM. This is the standard artist directory containing information on over 320,000 international artists, including their biography and pricing information.
  7. The Art of the Steal – Christopher Mason. An account of the big price-fixing scandal by two major auction houses: Christie’s and Sotheby’s. If involved in the art world, you should know about it; further, it really helps understanding the auction business.
  8. The Power of Art – Simon Schama Originally a TV series of the BBC, it was later turned into a book and is an incredibly accessible read; the author’s passion for the subject comes through, making it a very enjoyable read.
  9. The Art Crowd – Sophy Burnham. Illustrates the art scene very well; it might have been written a while ago, but is still accurate.
  10. Styles, schools and Movements – Amy Dempsey. An encyclopaedic guide to modern art. With all the styles and media currently around, this proves very insightful.

That’s it, those are our favourite 10 books. Get started, add your favourite read!

Research Resources: Top 10 London Libraries

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on September 15, 2010

For many artists research is a crucial starting point to the creation of new work. At Rise Art, we compiled a list of London Libraries our team enjoys, maybe there are some among them that you have not heard of yet?

  1. Courtauld Institute of Art Book Library The Art Book Library collection covers the history of art in the western tradition from classical antiquity to date.
  2. Witt Library is an image Library, consisting of a collection of reproductions of western art, after paintings, drawings and prints from 1200 to the present day. It is situated in the Courtauld Institute.
  3. The Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art is an educational charity aiming to promote and support the study of British history of art and architecture. Apart from a library, the centre offers a range of activities, such as lectures, and also grants!
  4. Tate – Archive Journeys is the beginning of the aim to provide online access to parts of its remarkable Archive. These journeys through three themes from the Tate Archive provide a fascinating insight into Tate’s Historythe Bloomsbury Group and the art world of the 1960s and 70s as seen through the eyes of the art critic Barbara Reise. We are looking forward to the further development of these archives!
  5. St Bride Library is also referred to as ‘printing’ library, as its collections cover printing and related subjects, such as paper and binding, graphic design and typography, illustration and printmaking, as well as publishing, book-selling and the social and economic aspects of printing.
  6. National Art Library located at the Victoria & Albert Museum is a major public reference library. Its strength lies in the range and depth of its holdings of documentary material
    concerning the fine and decorative arts of many countries and periods.
  7. The Woman’s Art Library (MAKE) in the Goldsmiths College main purpose is to provide a place for woman artists to deposit unique documentation of their work, thereby facilitating the study of work by women artists.
  8. The World Wide Web Virtual Library: History of Art is a collection of links relating to Art History and computer applications in Art History. The site is sponsored by CHArt, the Computers and History of Art Group. This site is especially focused on the academic study of Art History.
  9. ARLIS UK & Ireland is the professional organisation for people involved in providing library and information services and documenting resources in the visual arts.
  10. The British Library is the most extensive Library in this country.

Which libraries in London or the UK do you enjoy doing your research in? Go ahead, add them to the list and share your experiences!

The weird and wonderful shops in London

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on June 4, 2010

One aspect I enjoy particularly about London is that it caters for every individual and its taste. London has something appealing to offer for every personality and lifestyle. Isn’t it fabulous to discover all these different quarters, restaurants, bars and things? While roaming the city streets, we have come across some shops that were so wonderful and original that we thought they deserved a post of their own. These shops are a little different, great fun and further offer things that are unique – they are worth a visit, even if you are just window shopping!

1. Victor Wynd’s Little Shop of Horrors

Part of the infamous Last Tuesday Society, this little store and museum is crammed with curiosities and memorabilia, some very ancient, some contemporary. Entering this little store in Hackney, one is immediately overwhelmed by the huge amount of odd things on display: painted pig noses (of real pigs!) are stacked next to the till, cabinets overflowing with diverse animals’ sculls, chocolate anuses, broken children’s toys, stuffed animals and mexican charms. Downstairs is a little museum, where you can discover the most hilarious, frightening and funny things! In the back of the shop is also a small gallery space showcasing contemporary art.

2. The Multiple Store

This store has been set up by two art-lovers wanting to make contemporary works more accessible to the public by commissioning well-known artists to produced multiples (basically limited edition works in 3D, often with a fun twist). The works are outstanding and I for one got immediately attached and wanted to buy every work. Artists published by the Multiple Store include : Keith Coventry, Anna Gallaccio and Sarah Stanton. However, the pricing might be much lower than for an original work, but are still a small investment.

3. The Playlounge

Housed in a gallery-like space in Picadilly, this toy-shop has been created for geeky grown-ups and kids alike. It offers a big variety of products, from vinyl-toys to stationary to games and clothing – their link? They are all cutting edge toys for design-conscious people. The staff is very knowledgeable about the products in the store, no matter how exotic.

4. Luna and Curious

This shop, situated directly on Brick Lane is simply fabulous! The owners of the shop – 8 in total – are all delightful individuals welcoming you with a warm smile. The collective opened this store as an antithesis to mass-production; so every piece is hand crafted and has a unique touch. You will discover plenty of treasures, ranging from the most wonderful jewellery and headdresses made of feathers to delicate porcelain and hand made stationary as well as plenty of odd things.

5. Tate Giftshop

The Gift Shop at Tate Modern has a fun range of artsy merchandise. There you find anything from t-shirts accompanying current exhibitions to baby bibs by Julian Opie to fun erasers – there is something for every budget. Tate Modern also houses a book store with a vast range of books on art and art-related subjects.

6. Iconastas

This small store in the Picadilly Arcades is packed with Russian art dating from ancient times up to the communist area. It is a delight to browse around in its intimate atmosphere. The owner, Chris, is a charming if a little eccentric fellow who will happily share his profound knowledge of the works to anybody visiting the store.

Did you discover some original stores that you would like to share with the Rise Art community?