Rise Art

Our Pick: Rise Art’s top 5 Gallery Exhibitions of 2010

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on December 15, 2010

The Rise Art Team enjoyed compiling a top 5 museum exhibition list so much (see here) that we have opted to extend our shortlist bring your our top 5 gallery exhibition highlights of 2010. This time, however, given the breadth of gallery shows globally, and our limited time and travel budgets, we have kept the shortlist focused on London based galleries. In no particular order, here are our picks:

Vincent Fecteau at Greengrassi

San-Francisco based Vincent Fecteau might turn into one of the most influential contemporary artists working with formal languages of sculpture. His reference-abounding work was put onto the gallery walls like trophies. Fantastic!

Superunknown at Edel Assanti

This group show curated by Rise Art artist Andy Wicks and David Northedge consisted of twelve artists. Their work addressed a future full of dreams, illusions and fantasies, celebrating the neglected virtues of the glossy, lurid and bizarre. It was a great pleasure seeing so much young talent! Artists included: Michael Ashcroft, MAtthew Atkinson, Gordon Cheung, Sayshun Jay, Graham McNamara, David Northedge, Ed Payne, James Roper, Rob Sherwood, David Small, Andy Wicks and Rosalie Wiesner. We could be a bit biased on this one, but we really enjoyed it.

Noemie Goudal at Hotshoe Gallery

Parisian-born Noemie Goudal is an outstanding newcomer in photography; her show at Hotshoe Gallery displayed her series ‘Les Amants’ – her best so far! Since then she has been shown as part of the Anticipation event at Selfridges and her work is starting to get noticed by collectors outside of the M25. She is on our list of artist to expect big things of in 2011.

Louise Bourgeois at Hauser & Wirth

Haunch of Venison showed works by the late Louise Bourgeois, who passed away earlier this year – aged 98. The show focused on her works with fabric and we thought it was great. The show is on until December 18th – go see it if you have time!

Elaine Sturevant at Anthony Reynolds Gallery

This american artist became renown for playing with the concept of originality and her copies of other artists’ works; this time, it is a film in three acts: ‘Elastic Tango’ – a cosmic dance, perhaps?

I am sure we missed many more great exhibitions in London. What were your favorites?

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Our Pick: The top 5 Museum Exhibitions in 2010

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on December 8, 2010

As the end of the year nears, the Rise Art Team has picked our top 5 exhibition across the global museum landscape in 2010. Some of them run into 2011 and we highly recommend to go see them, if you are around. Here they are:

100 Years (version 2) at Moma PS1, New York City

November 1, 2009 – May 3, 2010

In collaboration with Performa, P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center created 100 Years (version #2, ps1, nov 2009), an exhibition presenting influential moments in the past century of performance art history.With over 200 works including film, photography, documents, and audio, the exhibition presented a wealth of information that is largely unknown and is intended as an archive for students, scholars, and enthusiasts of the history of performance art. It provided an excellent overview and insight.

Anish Kapoor: Turning the World Upside down at Kensington Gardens, London

September 28, 2010 – March 13, 2011

This exhibition organised by Serpentine Gallery and The Royal Parks showcases major recent works by London-based artist Anish Kapoor, The sculptures are sited to contrast and reflect the changing colours, foliage and weather in Kensington Gardens – creating stunning effects. The distortions in the works’ mirror-like surfaces call into question the viewers’ relationship to both the work itself and the surrounding environment. We found it a beautiful and unexpected way to enjoy the park.

1989. End of History or Beginning of the Future? at Kunsthalle, Vienna

October 9, 2009 – February 7, 2010

In 1989, the opening of the Iron Curtain marked the end of the Cold War and created an entirely novel geopolitical and mass-psychological situation. 20 years later, this exhibition investigated the metaphors connected with the collapse of the bipolar division of the world into East and West and the political upheaval, metaphors that are more than ever of relevance for a wide variety of different spheres of life.


André Kertész at Jeu de Paume, Paris

September 28, 2010 – February 6, 2011

During our stay in Paris to visit Paris Photo, we visited the exhibition of the photographer André Kertész. This comprehensive retrospective is the most extensive so far on show in Europe and definitely worth a visit, as his work is outstanding and plays an important part in the development of photography as an art form.


Neo Rauch – Companion at both,Museum of Fine Arts, Leibzig and Pinakothek, Munich

April 18 – August 15, 2010


For the painter’s 50th birthday, both museums organised his first major retrospective. Rauch, from the Leipzig Academy of Visual Arts is one of Germany’s most popular contemporary artists. Both shows, which offered a comprehensive look at his works since 1993 featured many works from private collection and unknown to the public until then.

Rise Art Artist Chris Hughes featured at Bloomberg New Contemporaries at the ICA

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on December 3, 2010

The Institute of Contemporary Art in London features annually the Bloomberg New Contemporaries, a highly regarded exhibition showcasing a snapshot of today’s emerging art landscape. Originally established in 1949 – it’s 2010 edition features 49 artists from across the UK working across all media. It offers recent graduates and art students essential support and recognition at a crucial stage in their development.

One of the artists selected for the 2010 exhibition is Chris Hughes, who also features on the Rise Art website. We are very exited for Chris to have such extraordinary opportunity and would like to congratulate him! Chris’ work deals with ‘places of trauma’; his drawings, which are currently displayed at the ICA and on the Rise Art homepage, are of extraordinary detail. Rise Art was at the opening of the show, and captured his work displayed at the ICA.

The panel for the 2010 exhibition consisted of former Turner Prize Winner Mark Leckey, Mexican artist Gabriel Kuri and the rising-star artist Dawn Mellor.

Rise Art @ Gallery Primo Alonso – ‘God is in the Details’

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on December 1, 2010

Over the past months Rise Art has been teaming up with galleries and events, supporting artists and curators alike. Currently Rise Art is working in collaboration with  Gallery Primo Alonso to host “God is in the Details” an exhibit which celebrates 13 artists across a variety of media who demonstrate a thorough and meticulous approach to their practice. Co-curators Medeia Cohen-Petrolino and Justin Hammond carefully selected the artists, aiming create a show ‘not just about the beauty that hard work produces, but also about a certain recognition for the technique and the skill involved.’

Among the artists represented are past Catlin Art Prize winner Alex Ball, and Rise Art artist Martin Krolzig. Krolzig was discovered by curator Medeia Cohen-Petrolino while reviewing artist portfolio’s on Rise Art. Said Cohen- Petrolino “Rise Art has been a great place for us to discover artists we wouldn’t normally have exposure to. We are excited to have Martin’s work as part of the exibit”

In celebration of the event, on Thursday, December 2nd at 7pm, Rise Art is hosting a evening reception at London’s Gallery Primo Alonso during which co-curator Justin Hammond and artists will introduce the show and works. The event is open to all by following the below RSVP link.

Event Details and RSVP here

Interview with Katie Rand – Winner of the First Rise Art Emerging Artists Grant

Posted in Interview by Scott @ Rise Art on October 20, 2010

Artist Katie Rand is about to take part in the Affordable Art Fair in Battersea Park from 21-24 October 2010 as an Artist-in-Residence. As the first artist to be selected and supported by Rise Art‘s Emerging Artists Grant programme– we have had the opportunity to ask her about her work and plans, and to introduce her mouth-watering, ephemeral work to our community.

Rise Art: Katie, in advance of your residency at Affordable Art Fair, what should people know about you and your background as an artist?

Katie Rand: I graduated this summer from the Arts University College Bournemouth, with a first class honours. During my time there I was involved in many exhibitions and events. My first London based exhibition was this year, at Free Range. I feel excited and honoured to have been invited to be the Artist-in- Residence this October at the AAF, and to have received Rise Art’s Production Grant to make this possible.

RA: Your choice of working with foods sets you apart form most artists. Why did you choose food as your preferred medium?

K.R.: I ask myself this question everyday! It all started at the end of my first year at University. I became interested in the child psychology, and the psychology of smell. Senses play a fundamental role in our everyday lives, which are often taken for granted. I began to question the way in which we view art. The visual is the obvious choice, and often sound, however smell is quite frequently ignored. How would a viewer react to purely smell and no visual? Would this still be considered art? Though experimentation and process I began to question the olfactory memory. Food became a key material, as it had many associations with childhood. It is a material that challenges my making, the perception of art and ones psychology.

RA: Food, unlike many materials artists use, is not durable but ephemeral – how does that impact on your work?

K.R.: The ephemeral qualities of my work play an important role. My work is often painstakingly tedious. It takes a great deal of time, planning and consideration. It excites me that there is never a permanent trace, apart from a memory or documentation of the work. I don’t like permanence as nothing lasts forever. I always have a starting point and a finishing point during the making process. The removal and destruction of the work is the finishing point. If I don’t reach this position the work is not complete.

RA: Are there any individuals or experiences that have impacted on your work?

K.R.: My work is influenced by so many things; however I am interested and inspired by Minimalism. The formal qualities interest me as does the machismo of the time. I often challenge these through my choice of material and structures, creating a sense of irony.

RA: The work you are doing for your residency at the Affordable Art Fair is a site-specific installation. How did you find the suitable installation for this location? What was your process in deciding what to do?

K.R.: The theme this October at the AAF is ‘Food Glorious Food’. That is why they approached me to be the artist-in-residence as my practice is fitting! I choose to re create (Memory 2008) because I wanted both children and adults to enjoy the work. It is fun, vibrant and interactive, which suits the AAF concept. I worked closely with the Program Manager throughout the decision, as I wanted it to be right for everyone.

RA: You graduated with a BA in Fine Art in 2010; how has the transition from school to being an artist been for you so far?

K.R.: So far so good! My feet are yet to touch the ground! I feel very lucky to have been given such a great opportunity with The Affordable Art Fair, so soon after graduating. Companies such as Rise Art and South West Artwork have been a great support.

RA: Where do you see the direction of your work heading? Do you have any particular plans?

K.R.: I have been offered a place on an MA Fine Art Course in London. I will be looking forward to starting next year. I have a couple of exhibitions lined up for 2011, which I am looking forward to also.

RA: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

K.R.: I have no idea! I know I would like to still be practicing! My life would be incomplete without art.

Katie’s work is viewable at the Affordable Art Fair from 21-24 October. Rise Art is proud to be supporting Katie’s work as Artist-in-Residence, with our new grant scheme enabling emerging artists to finish their projects . We will announce the next opportunity to submit work and be considered for the Rise Art Emerging Artists Grant in the forthcoming weeks – email info@riseart.com to receive further information on the programme.

Our team’s 10 favourite books on Art, it’s History and Market

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on September 21, 2010

With the great amount of books and publications on art available, it might at first seem hard to navigate around and find a good entry point into the subject. Thus, the Rise Art Team has decided to share our top 10 books on art, art history and the art market with you. We would love for everyone to add their favourite book to the post, in order to generate an extensive collection of titles.

Our top 10, in no particular order:

  1. The Story of Art – E. H. Gombrich. This highly regarded work provides a comprehensive overview of the history of Western art; it is a great classic by one of the most significant art historians Sir Ernst Gombrich.
  2. Seven Days in the Art World – Sarah Thornton. The author illustrates the contemporary art world with seven important events at the high end of the realm. Informative and entertaining.
  3. The Intrepid Art Collector – Lisa Hunter. This informative guide represents a great starter reference for the novice, giving confidence on starting a very on little collection.
  4. From Manet to Manhattan – Peter Watson. An excellent book providing a good overview of the development of the current art market. However, having been written in 1992, at the time the art market started to boom, it would be great to get an update on today’s status.
  5. The $12 Million Stuffed Shark – Don Thompson. If there is an update on the contemporary art market, it is this one.
  6. Davenport’s Art Reference and Price Guide – Book and CD-ROM. This is the standard artist directory containing information on over 320,000 international artists, including their biography and pricing information.
  7. The Art of the Steal – Christopher Mason. An account of the big price-fixing scandal by two major auction houses: Christie’s and Sotheby’s. If involved in the art world, you should know about it; further, it really helps understanding the auction business.
  8. The Power of Art – Simon Schama Originally a TV series of the BBC, it was later turned into a book and is an incredibly accessible read; the author’s passion for the subject comes through, making it a very enjoyable read.
  9. The Art Crowd – Sophy Burnham. Illustrates the art scene very well; it might have been written a while ago, but is still accurate.
  10. Styles, schools and Movements – Amy Dempsey. An encyclopaedic guide to modern art. With all the styles and media currently around, this proves very insightful.

That’s it, those are our favourite 10 books. Get started, add your favourite read!

Research Resources: Top 10 London Libraries

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on September 15, 2010

For many artists research is a crucial starting point to the creation of new work. At Rise Art, we compiled a list of London Libraries our team enjoys, maybe there are some among them that you have not heard of yet?

  1. Courtauld Institute of Art Book Library The Art Book Library collection covers the history of art in the western tradition from classical antiquity to date.
  2. Witt Library is an image Library, consisting of a collection of reproductions of western art, after paintings, drawings and prints from 1200 to the present day. It is situated in the Courtauld Institute.
  3. The Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art is an educational charity aiming to promote and support the study of British history of art and architecture. Apart from a library, the centre offers a range of activities, such as lectures, and also grants!
  4. Tate – Archive Journeys is the beginning of the aim to provide online access to parts of its remarkable Archive. These journeys through three themes from the Tate Archive provide a fascinating insight into Tate’s Historythe Bloomsbury Group and the art world of the 1960s and 70s as seen through the eyes of the art critic Barbara Reise. We are looking forward to the further development of these archives!
  5. St Bride Library is also referred to as ‘printing’ library, as its collections cover printing and related subjects, such as paper and binding, graphic design and typography, illustration and printmaking, as well as publishing, book-selling and the social and economic aspects of printing.
  6. National Art Library located at the Victoria & Albert Museum is a major public reference library. Its strength lies in the range and depth of its holdings of documentary material
    concerning the fine and decorative arts of many countries and periods.
  7. The Woman’s Art Library (MAKE) in the Goldsmiths College main purpose is to provide a place for woman artists to deposit unique documentation of their work, thereby facilitating the study of work by women artists.
  8. The World Wide Web Virtual Library: History of Art is a collection of links relating to Art History and computer applications in Art History. The site is sponsored by CHArt, the Computers and History of Art Group. This site is especially focused on the academic study of Art History.
  9. ARLIS UK & Ireland is the professional organisation for people involved in providing library and information services and documenting resources in the visual arts.
  10. The British Library is the most extensive Library in this country.

Which libraries in London or the UK do you enjoy doing your research in? Go ahead, add them to the list and share your experiences!

For Artists: How to fill calmer periods of time productively

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on September 8, 2010

As artist, work is generally rather project-based, often involving stressful periods of work followed by a calmer period of time.

Whatever the reason might be, during these calmer times, artists find themselves with extra time on their hands. At Rise Art, we have compiled a list of little projects to fill this time productively.

  1. Look online for opportunities. With the Internet, a great amount of opportunities for artists is published online and who knows, you might find a competition or group show you wish to apply for. Among the great amount of sites listing opportunities, at Rise Art, we particularly like the following: Artquest Opportunties, London Artist Quarter, Workhound, Saatchi Forum.
  2. Create a list of galleries. Just keep in mind your work needs to fit into the concept of the galleries, hence the galleries should be showing work similar to your own. Once you have a list:
  3. Update your Portfolio and CV before contacting the gallery. It is crucial to keep your portfolio up-to-date, as you will develop your style over time. Once this is done, you can:
  4. Approach the Galleries of which you have made a list.
  5. Update your website or blog. If you have not got online presence, we suggest you start creating an online presence – see this blog entry for further information.
  6. Attend or host a workshop. Is there a medium you have always wanted to play around with but never got around to do so? Or you are confident enough about teaching and would enjoy giving lessons or a week-end workshop?
  7. Clean out and organise your studio. Like clearing out a wardrobe, throw out or give away old brushes, paint and other gadgets you have not used for a long time. If needs be, put your paperwork in order, too.
  8. Do your taxes. No one enjoys doing them, but we all have to do them at some point – so why not start now? Did you know you could do it online? Click here for HRMC homepage
  9. Visit museums and galleries. Visits to cultural institutions might not only be inspiring, but also great networking opportunities.

As artists, you surely have experienced calmer periods of time – how have you made the most out of them? Please share your experiences and advice with the Rise Art community!

Upcoming Print and Multiple Art Fairs

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on September 3, 2010

After relaxing during August, the Art World makes a come back in September and October hosting a wide variety of events, exhibitions, shows, auctions and fairs; at Rise Art, we have compiled a little list of fairs selling multiples and prints for you during these two upcoming month, which might be interesting for you as artist and enthusiasts or collector alike.

  1. Piccadilly Self Publishing Fair is going to take place in Manchester on 3rd October 2010, followed by an exhibition until 8th October 2010. The fair is going to show around 40 stalls selling multiples, artists books and zines; these stalls are available for individuals and small presses alike. Artists can submit by  sending images of your work, some information about your work and your website – contact caitlinandsophielee@live.co.uk
  2. 20|21 British Art Fair, now in it’s 23rd year, is specialising exclusively in modern and contemporary British art. It is going to take place at the Royal College of Art from 15th to 19th of September 2010.
  3. 6by4 Secret Postcard Exhibition is going to take place from 12th to 14th November 2010 in Art Space Portsmouth. 6by4 is an exhibition and sale of original, postcard-sized artworks, created and donated by a variety of individuals: from established and emerging artists to amateurs originating from all corners of the world. All artists are invited to send submissions. The brief is simple: all entries (max three works per person) must be on card, 6 inches by four inches (15 x 10 cm) in any medium including drawing, painting, photography and collage. There is no entry fee, all funds raised through card sales will support Art Space Portsmouth 30th Anniversary initiatives.
  4. Multiplied is a new Fair initiated by the auction house Christie’s to be held during Frieze Art Fair from 14th to 17th October 2010 in London. We are curious to see what this fair, focusing on prints and multiples, will be like!
  5. Frieze Art Fair also has a section for multiples and prints.
  6. Affordable Art Fair from 21rst to 24th October in London. This Fair has approx. 120 stalls from artists and galleries; works are not allowed to be sold for more than £ 3,000.- It is a fun day out and maybe you find a work you want to take home.

Have you heard of other fairs or initiatives? Let us know and share it with our community!

Pop-Up Retail for your Artwork?

Posted in Uncategorized by Scott @ Rise Art on June 23, 2010

While it is nothing new for artists or galleries to occupy empty shops for a short period of time (I belive Claes Oldenburg’s ‘The Store‘ in New York, 1961 was amongst the first), Pop-up shops – are regaining popularity given the rise in available retail space in many city centers due to the lasting impact of the recent recession. Artist can and should take advantage of the current opportunity. As more shops empty, local councils and landlords are encouraging artist led initiatives – no one wants to live or shop in a ghost quarter, and pop-up retail can help revive and encourage investment in new retail space.

The rise in cheap short term retail locations may be fleeting, so artists should take advantage of this opportunity while it exists. But before throwing yourself head over heels in a pop-up project, there are a few things to consider. Landlords and Councils will want to see a viable plan for a pop-up project, and despite relatively low costs associated with pop-up spaces, a poorly planned project can cost artists time and money. A few thought when planning your next pop-up retail project:

  1. What is the purpose behind your project? Why is the pop-up show the right format?
  2. What work do I want to show? Is there a common thread throughout the work?
  3. Who do I want to see my show? This will define in what area of a city you would ideally show the work; does it have to be in the centre, or can it be in a ‘hidden spot’?
  4. How long do you want your project to last?
  5. What are your goals for the project? Try to define measurable objectives and set realistic goals that you can acheive.
  6. What will your project cost? Planning ahead can reduce expenses and uncover hidden costs
  7. Any idea how you will get ‘the word’ out there? Viral & Grassroots strategies can help you get the word out cheaply
  8. Why is your project an asset to the building or landlord? What do they get out of it?

Artist and Makers network have created a complete guide for pop-up shows for artists, downloadable here.

Now, where are you going to find a space? When I started sourcing potential locations for pop-ups shops, I did so by keeping my eyes open for empty shops and then try to find out who was responsible for letting it. But I have come a long way since then, and can tell you that there might be more efficient ways: contact the council in which you would like to show your work. Some of them request a draft of a proposal, which you already have if you have set down and answered the questions above. Then there are private companies you can get in touch with – listen to what they say, from experience I know that some of them have very specific ideas of what they wanted to see in their shops.

Recently, a new site Popupspace has launched and caters to individuals looking to let and source property for short term pop-up exhibits.

Before just saying yes, make sure you visit the space suggested to you and ensure that whatever you envisaged is possible to turn into reality. Be flexible with your expectations and ideas, but stay realistic. If you have whimsical work on display and are offered an old factory building, you might have to change your plans or say ‘no’ to the space.

What are your experiences with Pop-Up retail? Let us know what you have found helpful in planning your shows